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I'm currently converting the following piece of code to java from c#:

    public static byte MakeCS(byte[] arr)
    {
        byte cs = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < arr.Length; i++)
        {
            cs += arr[i];
        }
        return cs;
    }

My naive conversation is to just change the arr.Length to arr.length ;)

However this gives me incorrect checksums since java has signed bytes and c# has unsigned ones (I tried changing the c# code to sbyte and it worked fine).

What is the correct way to handkle the situation? I know I can "convert" a java byte to unsigned by bitand'ing it with 0xFF, but I'm not sure where to do this!

Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You only need to change the return value and make the return type int

return cs & 0xFF;

You don't need to change the type of cs as it will give the same result whether its an int, short or long after using 0xFF. You don't need to mask each value either.

public static void main(String... args) {
    byte[] bytes = { 1, -128, -1 }; // check sum is -128 or 0x80 or 128 (unsigned)
    System.out.println("makeCS "+ makeCS(bytes));
    System.out.println("makeCS2 "+ makeCS2(bytes));
    System.out.println("makeCS3 "+ makeCS3(bytes));
}

public static int makeCS(byte... arr) {
    byte cs = 0;
    for (byte b : arr)
        cs += b;
    return cs & 0xFF;
}

public static int makeCS2(byte[] arr)
{
    int cs = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++)
    {
        int add = arr[i];
        cs += (0xFF & add);
        cs &= 0xFF;
    }
    return cs;
}

public static short makeCS3(byte[] arr)
{
    short cs = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++)
    {
        cs += arr[i];
    }
    return cs;
}

prints

makeCS 128
makeCS2 128
makeCS3 -128
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for getting to the point better than my answer did. Although, to clarify for the OP: Basically, the only code that differs between signed and unsigned bytes is code that uses <=, >=, <, >, /, %, or toString. –  Louis Wasserman Mar 26 '12 at 16:05
    
For <= >= < and > you can add Byte.MIN_VALUE or & 0xFF For the rest you need & 0xFF The adding MIN_VALUE trick is useful for long as there isn't a larger type to cast to (other than BigInteger) –  Peter Lawrey Mar 26 '12 at 16:09
    
Some people prefer XORing or subtracting instead of adding, but it's all equivalent. (Personally, I find it easier to understand what's happening with ^, just because I don't have to reason through the overflow.) –  Louis Wasserman Mar 26 '12 at 16:17

Try this:

public static byte MakeCS(byte[] arr)
{
    int cs = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < arr.Length; i++)
    {
        int add = arr[i];
        cs += (0xFF & add);
        cs &= 0xFF;
    }
    return cs;
}

This will truncate the sign portion of the int before adding it to CS, and ten truncate everything past the eight's bit once again to emulate unsigned addition.

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This is not necessary. –  Louis Wasserman Mar 26 '12 at 15:39
    
@LouisWasserman Perhaps this is not the most efficient way of dealing with this, but I think as long as it works, it's a reasonable conversion. I doubt that the efficiency is of much concern here (unless the OP states otherwise). –  dasblinkenlight Mar 26 '12 at 15:43
    
Sorry, what I mean to say is that the OP's code as written works just fine. It's just the code that uses the OP's method that has to change its behavior. –  Louis Wasserman Mar 26 '12 at 15:44
    
Or, alternately, just use the OP's code as written except that you do & 0xFF in the return statement. –  Louis Wasserman Mar 26 '12 at 15:53

It sounds like you're expecting to use the entire 8 bits of the c# byte in order to do the sum. In order to correctly port to Java you'll need to pick a type which has at least the same precision. The closest type in Java is short.

public static short MakeCS(byte[] arr)
{
    short cs = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++)
    {
        cs += arr[i];
    }
    return cs;
}

Note: This isn't a perfect port though. It opens the possibility that code which would overflow in C# won't overflow in the Java version since Java short has more precision that C# byte.

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