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I'm writing a C wrapper API for my lib.

I generally pass my C++ objects as void* in C. And there are naturally access wrapper function for every object's public function. The C code does not access native C++ class members.

Yesterday, someone mentioned on IRC that I should not pass around pointer to C++ template classes as void* in C because it's dangerous. Is this true? How different are pointers to ordinary C++ classes from pointers to template classes?

Thanks!

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3  
You shouldn't pass member function pointers as void*. Or function pointers, I think. Also, consider using strongly-typed handles (typedef struct foo foo; foo* create_foo(); void destroy_foo(foo*); etc.) instead of void*. –  Cat Plus Plus Mar 26 '12 at 17:45
    
Hm, strongly-typed handles would be nicer probably, I'll see how that fits with my wrapper code... –  kralyk Mar 27 '12 at 6:43

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It is always safe to cast some pointer Foo* onto void* and then restore on the same type Foo*. When inheritance is used however, a special care should be taken. Upcasting/downcasting shouldn't be done through the void* pointer. Consider the following code:

#include <cassert>

class Parent
{
    int bar;
};

class Derived : public Parent
{
    virtual void foo() { }
};

int main()
{
    Derived d;
    Derived* ptr_derived = &d;
    void *ptr_derived_void = ptr_derived;
    Derived*    ptr_derived_from_void = (Derived*)ptr_derived_void;

    assert(ptr_derived_from_void == ptr_derived);   //that's OK

    Parent* ptr_parent = ptr_derived;   //upcast
    Parent* ptr_parent_from_void = (Parent*)ptr_derived_void;   //upcast?

    assert(ptr_parent_from_void == ptr_parent); //that's not OK

    return 0;
}

Also this post shows some problem with casting through void*.

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It's bogus. Templates have no special properties re casting that a normal class wouldn't have. Make sure you always use the appropriate cast and you will be fine.

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This is unrelated to templates vs. normal classes, but if your class has multiple inheritance you should always start with the same type before casting to void*, and likewise when casting back. The address of a pointer will change based on which parent class the pointer type is.

class ParentA
{
    // ...
    int datumA;
};

class ParentB
{
    // ...
    int datumB;
};

class Derived : public ParentA, public ParentB
{
    // ...
};

int main()
{
    Derived d;
    ParentA * ptrA = &d;
    ParentB * ptrB = &d;
    assert((void*)ptrA == (void*)ptrB); // asserts!
}
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@Nawaz, did you try it? I did with VS 2010. Whether you use C-style casts or reinterpret_cast makes no difference. –  Mark Ransom Mar 26 '12 at 18:12

A template class instantiated with a classes A and B as template args involves the compiler creating two seperate classes that specifically handle these respective types. In many ways this is like an intelligent strongly typed preprocessor macro. It is not that different to manually copy-pasting two seperate "normal" classes who operate on A and B respectively. So no.

The only way it will be dangerous is if you try to cast what was originally:

MyClass<A>

as

MyClass<B>

if A is not B, since they could have a different memory layout.

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Pointers are just that: pointers to data. The "type" of a pointer makes no difference to anything really (at compile time), it's just for readability and maintainability of code.

For example:

 Foo<a> *x = new Foo<a>();
 void *y = (void*)x;
 Foo<a> *z = (Foo<a>*)y;

Is perfectly valid and will cause no issues. The only problem when casting pointer types is that you may run into dereferencing issues when you've forgotten what the underlying data-type a pointer is referencing actually is.

If you're passing around void* everywhere, just be careful to maintain type integrity.

Don't do something like:

Foo<a> *x = new Foo<a>();
void *z = (void*)x;
//pass around z for a while, then mistakenly...
Foo<b> *y = (Foo<b>*)z;

By accident!

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This isn't strictly true. When inheritance is involved, casting a pointer could involve adjusting the value in memory to point to superclass or subclass data. But that has nothing to do with templates; that just means you need to be careful about casting with the appropriate operator. –  StilesCrisis Mar 26 '12 at 20:04

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