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I had this code:

int foo(void){
    return 1;
}

int main(void){
    static const int x = foo();

    //do stuff
    return 0;
}

But I got an error about initializing a static variable with a non-const value. I thought it had something to do with the const specifier, but it didn't. I ended dropping the const keyword and doing this:

int foo(void){
    return 1;
}

int main(void){
    static int x = 0;
    if (x == 0) x = foo();

    //do stuff
    return 0;
}

Now, why can't the compiler just delay the initialization of the static int x variable until it's used, and more importantly, why can't it just put it in a read-write section, and just enforce that it's not written to in compile time? I'd like to use the const AND static keyword for improved semantics in my code, but I don't really care how the compiler handles this, just let it work.

Is my understanding of the C standard wrong? Or is my compiler sucking? It's MSVC 9.0.

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1  
What is static variable in main good for? –  tchap Mar 26 '12 at 17:50
    
'x' looks like a local variable in the context of your example. Why do you want this to be static? –  Val Akkapeddi Mar 26 '12 at 17:51
    
@ValAkkapeddi: Often due to the fact that you don't need/want to reinitialize it for each call to that function. –  Ed S. Mar 26 '12 at 17:52
    
Sorry, it's not in main actually, I just put it in main so the snippet could be compiled standalone. –  Spidey Mar 26 '12 at 17:54
1  
@tchap: It's useful if the object is too large to fit on the stack, or if you want to re-enter main. (In C it's legal to call main recursively.) –  R.. Mar 26 '12 at 18:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

C requires it.

From the C Standard:

(C99, 6.7.8p4) "All the expressions in an initializer for an object that has static storage duration shall be constant expressions or string literals."

Note that the const qualifier does not mean constant but rather read-only. A const object is not a constant in C.

The reason a static object cannot be initialized by a non constant value is related to the fact that the initialization of a static object is done "prior to program startup" (C99, 6.2.4p3).

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Please, explain what's the difference between a const object and a constant in C. A constant in C is a literal value? –  Spidey Mar 26 '12 at 17:58
    
The definition of a constant expression in C is extremely limited. It's defined in C99 in 6.6 Constant Expressions (html version at port70.net/~nsz/c/c99/n1256.html#6.6) –  R.. Mar 26 '12 at 18:04
    
@Spidey a constant is basically a scalar literal, see C99, 6.4.4 for the definition. A constant is a constant expression. A const object is neither a constant nor a constant expression. –  ouah Mar 26 '12 at 18:08
    
then how come you are allowed to do so in C++? –  Untitled Nov 14 '12 at 19:25
1  
@SahandMozaffari C and C++ are two different languages (even if C inspired C++ and then C++ inspired C). Note that in C++, contrary to C, a const is really a constant. –  ouah Nov 14 '12 at 19:54

The value for initialization must be determined at compile or link time. C doesn't have the concept of constructors that could be run at the startup of the program.

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This constraint comes from C standard's section 6.7.8/4, so it's not just your compiler:

All the expressions in an initializer for an object that has static storage duration shall be constant expressions or string literals.

The reason for this is that unlike C++ standard, C sdoes not require execution environments to provide an entry point for pre-run initialization (while certainly not prohibiting it; The manner and timing of static initialization (5.1.2) is unspecified).

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