Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a function defined as

myFun <- function(x, y, ...) {
  # using exists
  if (exists("z")) { print("exists z!") }
  # using missing
  try(if (!missing("z")) { print("z is not missing!") }, silent = TRUE)
  # using get
  try(if (get("z")) { print("get z!") }, silent = TRUE)

  # anotherFun(...)
}

In this function, I want to check whether user input "z" in the argument list. How can I do that? I tried exists("z"), missing("z"), and get("z") and none of them works.

share|improve this question
    
Can you show exactly how you've used missing? Because AFAIK that's the correct function to use. –  joran Mar 26 '12 at 18:06
    
It would help if you provide a bit more context. There may be a better way to do what you're trying to accomplish. –  Joshua Ulrich Mar 26 '12 at 18:15
1  
@joran, missing() only applies for argument. Here there is no argument z, it can only be entered as part of ... –  Sacha Epskamp Mar 26 '12 at 18:18
    
@SachaEpskamp I agree. I simply wasn't sure if what the OP wrote was actually what they were doing. –  joran Mar 26 '12 at 18:20
    
I've modified the code in the question to make it easier to understand. Thanks for the comments. –  danioyuan Mar 26 '12 at 18:42
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

@Sacha Epskamp has a pretty good solution, but it doesn't always work. The case where it fails is if the "z" argument is passed in as NULL...

# Sacha's solution
myFun <- function(x, y, ...) { 
  args <- list(...)
  exist <- !is.null(args[['z']])
  return(exist)
}

myFun(x=3, z=NULL) # FALSE, but should be TRUE!


# My variant
myFun2 <- function(x, y, ...) {
  args <- list(...)
  exist <- "z" %in% names(args)
  exist
}

myFun2(x=3, z=NULL) # TRUE
share|improve this answer
add comment

I think you're simply looking for hasArg

myFun <- function(x, y, ...) { 
  hasArg(z)
}

> myFun(x=3, z=NULL)
[1] TRUE

From ?hasArg:

The expression hasArg(x), for example, is similar to !missing(x), with two exceptions. First, hasArg will look for an argument named x in the call if x is not a formal argument to the calling function, but ... is. Second, hasArg never generates an error if given a name as an argument, whereas missing(x) generates an error if x is not a formal argument.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Here is a way I often do it. First convert ... to a list, then check if the elements are not NULL:

myFun <- function(x, y, ...) { 
args <- list(...)
exist <- !is.null(args[['z']])
return(exist)
}

Some results:

> myFun()
[1] FALSE
> myFun(z=1)
[1] TRUE
share|improve this answer
    
Works like magic. Thanks! –  danioyuan Mar 26 '12 at 18:19
    
I don't think this is the intended way ... is supposed to be used though. It is more a way of passing arguments to another function, but this is how I currently use it in my package as well (I really should change that:)) –  Sacha Epskamp Mar 26 '12 at 18:21
1  
Sacha, I do agree with you. If "z" is used in this function, it should not be in the ... But very often code is already written and making one change in the argument list can introduce errors that requires many changes to fix. So this is my lazy way to make it work. :) –  danioyuan Mar 26 '12 at 18:34
1  
I added an alternative solution that also handles myFun(z=NULL) –  Tommy Mar 26 '12 at 18:35
    
@danioyuan Also this gives you awesome hidden and undocumented arguments that only you know about! –  Sacha Epskamp Mar 26 '12 at 18:42
show 1 more comment

There might be instances when you might not want to call list(...), since this will evaluate all the expressions in the dots. For example,

myFun <- function(x, y, ...){
  myArgs <- list(...)
  zInArgs <- ("z" %in% names(myArgs))
  return(zInArgs)
}

myFun(x = 2, y = "Happy", z = list(rep(rnorm(2e6), 100)))

This will take a long time. Instead, use match.call():

myFun <- function(x, y, ...){
  myArgs <- match.call()
  zInArgs <- ("z" %in% names(myArgs))
  return(zInArgs)
}

myFun(x = 2, y = "Happy", z = list(rep(rnorm(2e6), 100)))

The first example is still chugging away on my machine, while the second example should take practically no time at all.

EDIT:

To answer the comment from @CarlWitthoft:

R> system.time(
+   (myAns <- myFun(x = 2, y = "Happy", z = list(rep(rnorm(2e6), 100))))
+ )
   user  system elapsed 
      0       0       0 
R> myAns
[1] TRUE
share|improve this answer
    
For completeness' sake, can you report on the time it does take to run the second example? –  Carl Witthoft Mar 27 '12 at 12:13
    
Hi @CarlWitthoft, please see my edit above. Do you get differing results? –  BenBarnes Mar 27 '12 at 13:13
    
well, I get NULL for a result because I'm not allowed (yet) to install R at work :-(. So, thanks for doing the timing tests. –  Carl Witthoft Mar 27 '12 at 21:40
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.