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The objective is to create indicators for a factor/string variable in a data frame. That dataframe has > 2mm rows, and running R on windows, I don't have the option of using plyr with .parallel=T. So I'm taking the "divide and conquer" route with plyr and reshape2.

Running melt and cast runs out of memory, and using

ddply( idata.frame(items) , c("ID") , function(x){
       (    colSums( model.matrix( ~ x$element - 1) ) > 0   )
} , .progress="text" )    

or

ddply( idata.frame(items) , c("ID") , function(x){
           (    elements %in% x$element   )
    } , .progress="text" )  

does take a while. The fastest approach is the call to tapply below. Do you see a way to speed this up? The %in% statement runs faster than the model.matrix call. Thanks.

set.seed(123)

dd <- data.frame(
  id  = sample( 1:5, size=10 , replace=T ) ,
  prd = letters[sample( 1:5, size=10 , replace=T )]
  )

prds <- unique(dd$prd)

tapply( dd$prd , dd$id , function(x) prds %in% x )
share|improve this question
    
I'm confused by your example. You're splitting dd$prd by dd$id, then asking which values of prds are represented in each id -- but prds is not sorted (!) Did you want prds <- sort(unique(dd$prd)) (that would make much more sense to me ...) ? –  Ben Bolker Mar 26 '12 at 19:46
    
As long as the indicators (the logicals) corresponding to elements available in prds have the same order across IDs, it doesn't matter how they're sorted. –  M.Dimo Mar 26 '12 at 20:00
    
OK. See my other question, in my answer below ... –  Ben Bolker Mar 26 '12 at 20:02
    
I wonder how data.table compares to bigtable in this example. –  Matt Dowle Mar 27 '12 at 8:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

For this problem, the packages bigmemory and bigtabulate might be your friends. Here is a slightly more ambitious example:

library(bigmemory)
library(bigtabulate)

set.seed(123)

dd <- data.frame(
  id = sample( 1:15, size=2e6 , replace=T ), 
  prd = letters[sample( 1:15, size=2e6 , replace=T )]
  )

prds <- unique(dd$prd)

benchmark(
bigtable(dd,c(1,2))>0,
table(dd[,1],dd[,2])>0,
xtabs(~id+prd,data=dd)>0,
tapply( dd$prd , dd$id , function(x) prds %in% x )
)

And the results of benchmarking (I'm learning new things all the time):

                                            test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self user.child sys.child
1                      bigtable(dd, c(1, 2)) > 0          100  54.401 1.000000    51.759    3.817          0         0
2                    table(dd[, 1], dd[, 2]) > 0          100 112.361 2.065422   107.526    6.614          0         0
4 tapply(dd$prd, dd$id, function(x) prds %in% x)          100 178.308 3.277660   166.544   13.275          0         0
3                xtabs(~id + prd, data = dd) > 0          100 229.435 4.217478   217.014   16.660          0         0

And that shows bigtable winning out by a considerable amount. The results are pretty much that all prds are in all IDs, but see ?bigtable for details on the format of the results.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much. –  M.Dimo Mar 26 '12 at 21:07
    
The run just completed (using bigtable) on the actual dataset (!). –  M.Dimo Mar 26 '12 at 21:16

Your use of the %in% function seems backwards to me. And if you want an true/false result for each row of data then you should use either %in% as a vector operation or ave. Although it's not needed here you might want to use it if there were a more complex function that needed to be applied to every item.

set.seed(123)

dd <- data.frame(
  id  = sample( 1:5, size=10 , replace=T ) ,
  prd = letters[sample( 1:5, size=10 , replace=T )]
  )

prds <- unique(dd$prd)
target.prds <- prds[1:2]
dd$prd.in.trgt <- with( dd, prd %in% target.prds)
share|improve this answer
    
There will be as many indicators as there are prds ( or target.prds): c(1,2,3) %in% c(1) will indicate that 1 is in that record, but neither 2 nor 3. –  M.Dimo Mar 26 '12 at 20:04
    
You cannot just redefine %in% to be something that it is not. And a dataframe needs all elements to have regular number of entries per row. You need to use a data structure that accommodates a variable number if "hits", ... either a logical matrix of TRUEs and FALSEs or a list. –  BondedDust Mar 26 '12 at 20:10
    
Not sure I understand what you're saying. The call to %in% will always return the same number of logicals. I started out with function(x) unique(x$prd) in the tapply call, and that would have produced a ragged array. –  M.Dimo Mar 26 '12 at 20:44

Can you say a little bit more how the problem would scale in terms of numbers of levels, numbers of IDs, etc. (if you keep the numbers of levels fixed, then for enough individuals the indicator matrix you're computing will approach all TRUE/all 1 ...)? I expected that xtabs would be faster, but it's not for an example of this size ...

library(rbenchmark)
benchmark(
          tapply( dd$prd , dd$id , function(x) prds %in% x ),
          xtabs(~id+prd,data=dd)>0)

     test        replications elapsed relative 
1 tapply(...)             100   0.053 1.000000
2 xtabs(...) > 0          100   0.120 2.264151  
share|improve this answer
    
There are 13.5million items (across 780,000 IDs, so multiple items per IDs). There are 83 different elements in prd. Thanks for drawing my attention to rbenchmark by the way. –  M.Dimo Mar 26 '12 at 20:12

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