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So I have a general question. Lets say I want to create car objects in this program I am writing and I have to create hundreds of this car object. Is it better to create a car abstract class and extend it when I make my car object(i.e. Toyota, Nissan, etc.) or could I use a bunch of static classes that hold the details of the specific object and use that in a general car object to make the Toyota or Nissan? I think the using the abstract method should be pretty self explanatory but here is an example of the second method:

public class CarNames {

public static String getCarName(int pCarIndex){

    switch (pCarIndex) {
    case 0:         
        return "Toyota";
    default:
        throw new Error("pCarIndex does not exist!");
    }
}

}

Which is used in this class to create the object:

public class Car{

    private int mCar_ID;//This indicates which Car to load
    private String mCarName;

public Car(int pCar_ID){
    mCar_ID = pCar_ID;
            mCarName = CarNames.getCarName(pCar_ID);
            //Do Stuff with collected parameters 
}

}

Let me know if something doesn't make sense. Thanks.

EDIT: The cars may have different parameters such as size, engine, etc. The reason I chose an abstract class is because I think it offers more flexibility than an interface, since I could add methods down the line.

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2  
Is the only thing that is different between each type of car the name? Or will they each have their own methods as well? –  zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz Mar 26 '12 at 20:04
    
In the code you posted, you could use enums instead of ints. –  assylias Mar 26 '12 at 20:05
    
So you're saying to skip the static classes completely and go directly to enums? I'll have to brush up on that. –  rioneye Mar 26 '12 at 20:08
    
I would take a look at the strategy pattern, if you are going to add methods that are only valid for a certain type of car, it will save you loads. Mind you, I don't have a clear idea of what you are trying to develop, maybe the strategy pattern is very over the top. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strategy_pattern –  len Mar 26 '12 at 20:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Is it better to create a car abstract class and extend it when I make my car object(i.e. Toyota, Nissan, etc.) or could I use a bunch of static classes that hold the details of the specific object and use that in a general car object to make the Toyota or Nissan?

Neither. You have precisely one Car class and a file (e.g., database) containing the details of a particular vehicle. You then create instances of that one Car class based upon the file contents.

The cars may have different parameters such as size, engine, etc.

Programmers for the past half-century have referred to this as "data". The less data you bake into your source code, the better.

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Ok, I think I understand what you are saying. I do have a question, though. Wouldn't it take longer to read data from a file or does the performance hit only come when writing to files? Thanks –  rioneye Mar 26 '12 at 22:45
    
@rioneye: "Wouldn't it take longer to read data from a file" -- most programs come in the form of files, and have done so since the file replaced punch cards. What makes you think that reading a file (program) will somehow be dramatically faster than reading a file (database)? This is particularly true with databases, where you might not need to read in all the data if you are not working with all the cars at once. –  CommonsWare Mar 26 '12 at 23:03
    
Ok, but I have one more question. The file, lets say xml, would only be useful if all the parameters were strings, bools, etc, right? For example, assume the engine is an object that has methods that control the acceleration and so on. How could I store that object in a file? –  rioneye Mar 27 '12 at 1:32

I am going to take a stab at this... I am not sure if your goal in the end is ease of maintenance or memory or... I am going to guess that because this is an Android question your concern is with memory. Especially when you talk about 100's of objects.

My first thought the flyweight pattern it will allow those objects to share memory and have smaller footprints. But I am with the @CommonsWare answer... Part of what your are talking about is data. If I understand your question, your plan is to define all the the different parts of your car in code based on the cardId that doesn't sound very efficient. That sounds like data, whether it be xml or sqllite database.

You might be talking about Nissans which could end up as a type (class) extending the abstract class car, but the engine size, height, width, and gas mileage is all data.

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Thanks. It seems I'll have to do more research on xml's in android. –  rioneye Mar 26 '12 at 22:46

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