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the javascript:alert code that is being dynamically created ONLY works if I use the global object reference, gvo_Z.

But I would prefer to use either this (or a proxy to it such as lvo_this).

<div id = "target_div" ></div>   

<script language="javascript" type="text/javascript">
  function c_A( ) 
    { this.om_A = function()
        { return "got it" ;
        } ;
    } ;

  function c_Z( ) 
    { this.pvo_A = new c_A() ;

      this.om_Z = function()
        { 
          var lvo_this = this ;

          var lvs_html = "<div onmousedown='javascript:alert( gvo_Z.pvo_A.om_A() );' >press me ... WORKS ... uses global reference</div>" ;
          lvs_html += "<div onmousedown='javascript:alert( lvo_this.pvo_A.om_A() );' >press me ... does NOT work ... uses THIS reference</div>" ;
          document.getElementById( "target_div" ).innerHTML = lvs_html ;
        } ;
    } ;

  var gvo_Z = new c_Z( ) ;
  gvo_Z.om_Z() ;
</script>
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You don't need "javascript:" at the beginning of code in an "onfoo" attribute. –  Pointy Mar 26 '12 at 20:17
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

add a function to your created element. you can create your element with a name tag like this

<div id = "target_div" ></div>   

<script language="javascript" type="text/javascript">
  function c_A( ) 
    { this.pvs_test = "test" ;
    } ;

  function c_Z( ) 
    { this.pvo_A = new c_A() ;

      this.om_Z = function()
    { 
      var lvo_this = this ;


      var lvs_html = "<div name='yourdiv'>press me ... does NOT work ... uses THIS reference</div>" ;
      document.getElementById( "target_div" ).innerHTML = lvs_html ;
document.getElementsByName( "yourdiv" )[0].onclick = function() {
alert(lvo_this.pvo_A.pvs_test);
};
    } ;
    } ;

  var gvo_Z = new c_Z( ) ;
  gvo_Z.om_Z() ;
</script>
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Inside the scope of the function this is DOMWindow

Try this instead:

function c_A() {
    this.pvs_test = "test";
};

function c_Z() {

    var self = this;

    this.pvo_A = new c_A();
    this.om_Z = function() {

        var lvo_this = self;

        var lvs_html = "<div onmousedown='javascript:alert( gvo_Z.pvo_A.pvs_test );' >my div</div>";
        document.getElementById("target_div").innerHTML = lvs_html;
    };
};

var gvo_Z = new c_Z();
gvo_Z.om_Z();​
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If you put the script in the string, it will execute when it is inserted, not with the current context. This is in addition to the other answers, which are correct that you need to declare your "proxy" outside the om_Z() method.

Just construct the script by actually executing the relevent expression immediately:

var lvs_html = "<div onmousedown='javascript:alert(" + lvo_this.pvo_A.pvs_test + ");' >my div</div>" ;
share|improve this answer
    
bhamlin, thanks for responding ... the example that I posted was simplified ... in reality I am not wanting to access the simple string prop of c_A, but rather a method of c_A ... I will edit it to reflect it. –  dsdsdsdsd Mar 26 '12 at 20:26
    
Then you cannot simply put the script onto the element as a string, because you lose all context (and therefore require a global object). Consider binding the action to the element after you have inserted it - then'll you'll still be in scope of your om_Z() (and c_Z()) methods. –  bhamlin Mar 26 '12 at 20:30
    
maybe binding is the way to go ... –  dsdsdsdsd Mar 26 '12 at 20:33
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