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I'm not understanding how Twitter Bootstrap does active links for the navigation. If I have a regular navigation like this (with ruby on rails linking):

<ul class="nav">
  <li class="active"> <a href="/link">Link</a> </li>
  <li class=""> <a href="/link">Link</a> </li>
  <li class=""> <a href="/link">Link</a> </li>        
</ul>

How do I keep it active based on the link clicked?

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16 Answers

up vote 57 down vote accepted

Just made an answer on the very same question here Twitter Bootstrap Pills with Rails 3.2.2

<ul class="nav">
  <li class="<%= 'active' if params[:controller] == 'controller1' %>"> <a href="/link">Link</a> </li>
  <li class="<%= 'active' if params[:controller] == 'controller2' %>"> <a href="/link">Link</a> </li>
  <li class="<%= 'active' if params[:controller] == 'controller3' %>"> <a href="/link">Link</a> </li>        
</ul>
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Wow, thanks. Would have never figured this out! –  LearningRoR Mar 26 '12 at 20:51
11  
I think the idea is correct here, but going directly to the params hash seems like a bad idea. Likewise for repeating the same code over and over. I would recommend at least using the current_page? method to check the current controller/action, and would also move the code into a helper to avoid the code repetition. –  Dustin Frazier May 9 '12 at 17:17
2  
I wonder how do I write the same in haml. Converting to haml doesn't work for me. Or perhaps I'm wrong somewhere –  benchwarmer Jul 16 '12 at 17:31
5  
HAML implementation %li{:class => "#{'active' if current_page?(root_path)}"}=link_to "Home", root_path –  Brian Feb 18 '13 at 0:44
1  
Rails docs recommends the use of controller_name and action_name helpers instead of accessing them from the params hash. –  Alexander Suraphel Sep 29 '13 at 14:30
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You can use something like (very similar to what @phil mentioned, but a little shorter):

<ul class="nav">
  <li class="<%= 'active' if current_page?(root_path) %>"><%= link_to "Home", root_path %></li>
  <li class="<%= 'active' if current_page?(about_path) %>"><%= link_to "About", about_path %></li>
  <li class="<%= 'active' if current_page?(contact_path) %>"><%= link_to "Contact", contact_path %></li>
</ul>
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6  
This is dark magic! –  holyredbeard Feb 13 '13 at 0:01
    
LOL... don't you love it? –  yorch Feb 13 '13 at 15:48
    
Yes, indeed I do :-) –  holyredbeard Feb 13 '13 at 18:27
5  
doesn't work if you have subnavigation. The path changes but you're in the same section.. makes sense? –  Jakob Dam Jensen Mar 31 '13 at 19:53
1  
yes, correct, if you want to highlight a menu item no matter what method you are running inside the same controller, you could use @Pierre solution: 'active' if params[:controller] == 'controller1' –  yorch May 9 '13 at 16:48
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https://github.com/twg/active_link_to

<%= active_link_to 'Users', users_path, :wrap_tag => :li %>

#=> <li class="active"><a href="/users">Users</a></li>

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2  
Love it. Why rewrite the wheel? –  lightyrs Dec 18 '12 at 21:43
    
This should really be the way to go...Unless you don't want to pull in another dependency. –  Mark37 Apr 22 '13 at 1:40
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Use this instead to select active link in nav based on the current route without server code:

    $(document).ready(function () {
        $('a[href="' + this.location.pathname + '"]').parent().addClass('active');
    });
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I've found success using the logical and (&&) in haml:

%ul.nav
  %li{class: current_page?(events_path) && 'active'}
    = link_to "Events", events_path
  %li{class: current_page?(about_path) && 'active'}
    = link_to "About Us", about_path
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For each link:

<% if current_page?(home_path) -%><li class="active"><% else -%><li><% end -%>
  <%= link_to 'Home', home_path %>
</li>

or even

<li <% if current_page?(home_path) -%>class="active"<% end -%>>
  <%= link_to 'Home', home_path %>
</li>
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not sure if you are asking about how the twitter bootstrap css is used, or the rails side. I'm assuming the rails side.

if so checkout the #link_to_if method or the #link_to_unless_current method

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Today I had the same question/problem but with an other approach for the solution. I create a helper function in application_helper.rb:

def navMainAktiv(actionName)
    if params[:action] == actionName    
    "active"
    end
end

and the link looks like this:

<li class="<%= navMainAktiv('about')%>"><%= link_to "About", about_path %></li>

You can replace params[:action] with params[:controller] and set your controller name in the link.

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I use this for each li:

<li><%= link_to_unless_current('Home', root_path) { link_to('Home', root_path, class: 'active') } %></li>

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You should do it yourself by manipulating CSS classes. That is, if a user clicks on some link, then do something (target action), set previous link inactive and new link active.

If your links take you to the server (that is, make page reload), then you can just render active link correctly on the server. Otherwise, if you're doing some client-side stuff (switching tab panes or whatever), you have to use javascript.

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you could use tabulous for the links

article here on how to combine tabulous with twitter bootstrap and rails 3.x

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I wrote simple helper method using build in view helper current_page? when you can specify custom class name in html_options hash.

def active_link_to(name = nil, options = nil, html_options = nil, &block)
  active_class = html_options[:active] || "active"
  html_options.delete(:active)
  html_options[:class] = "#{html_options[:class]} #{active_class}" if current_page?(options)
  link_to(name, options, html_options, &block)
end

Examples (when you are on root_path route):

<%= active_link_to "Main", root_path %>
# <a href="/" class="active">Main</a>

<%= active_link_to "Main", root_path, class: "bordered" %>
# <a href="/" class="bordered active">Main</a>

<%= active_link_to "Main", root_path, class: "bordered", active: "disabled" %>
# <a href="/" class="bordered disabled">Main</a>
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Many of the answers here have things that will work, or partial answers. I combined a bunch of things to make this rails helper method I use:

# helper to make bootstrap3 nav-pill <li>'s with links in them, that have
# proper 'active' class if active. 
#
# the current pill will have 'active' tag on the <li>
#
# html_options param will apply to <li>, not <a>. 
#
# can pass block which will be given to `link_to` as normal. 
def bootstrap_pill_link_to(label, link_params, html_options = {})
  current = current_page?(link_params)

  if current
    html_options[:class] ||= ""
    html_options[:class] << " active "
  end

  content_tag(:li, html_options) do
    link_to(label, link_params)
  end      
end

It could be made even fancier with argument checking to support &block on the link_to etc.

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You sound like you need to implement a navigation system. If it's complex, it might get pretty ugly and pretty fast.

In this case, you might want to use a plugin that can handle that. You could use navigasmic or simple navigation (I would recommend navigasmic because it keeps the main layer in a view, where it belongs, and not in some configuration)

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I used a helper to implement this in the style of Rails' form helpers.

In a helper (e.g. app/helpers/ApplicationHelper.rb):

def nav_bar
  content_tag(:ul, class: "nav navbar-nav") do
    yield
  end
end

def nav_link(text, path)
  options = current_page?(path) ? { class: "active" } : {}
  content_tag(:li, options) do
    link_to text, path
  end
end

Then, in a view (e.g. app/views/layouts/application.html.erb):

<%= nav_bar do %>
  <%= nav_link 'Home', root_path %>
  <%= nav_link 'Posts', posts_path %>
  <%= nav_link 'Users', users_path %>
<% end %>

This example produces (when on the 'users' page):

<ul class="nav navbar-nav">
  <li><a href="/">Home</a></li>
  <li><a href="/posts">Posts</a></li>
  <li class="active"><a href="/users">Users</a></li>
</ul>
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Many answers already, but here is what I wrote to get Bootstrap Icons working with active link. Hope It will help someone

This helper will give you:

  1. li element with link containing custom text
  2. Optional Bootstrap3 Icon
  3. will turn active when you're on the right page

Put this in your application_helper.rb

def nav_link(link_text, link_path, icon='')
  class_name = current_page?(link_path) ? 'active' : ''
  icon_class = "glyphicon glyphicon-" + icon

  content_tag(:li, :class => class_name) do
    (class_name == '') ? (link_to content_tag(:span, " "+link_text, class: icon_class), link_path)
    : (link_to content_tag(:span, " "+link_text, class: icon_class), '#')
  end
end

And use link:

<%= nav_link 'Home', root_path, 'home'  %>

Last argument is optional - it will add icon to the link. Use names of glyph icons. If you want icon with no text:

    <%= nav_link '', root_path, 'home'  %>
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