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Consider that I have 1 resource and 2 urls (let's say new one and old one) connected to that resourse. So, i want to setup HTTP redirection for one of urls.

In myapp/urls.py I have:

urlpatterns = patterns('',
    url(r'^(?P<param>\d+)/resource$', 
                      'myapp.views.resource', 
                       name='resource-view'
    ),
)

In mycoolapp/urls.py I want to specify:

from django.views.generic.simple import redirect_to
from django.core.urlresolvers import reverse_lazy

urlpatterns = patterns('',
    url(r'^coolresource/(?P<param>\d+)/$', 
                       redirect_to, 
                       {
                          'url': reverse_lazy('resourse-view', 
                                         kwargs={'param': <???>}, 
                                         current_app='myapp'
                                 ),
                       }
   ),
)

The question is how to pass <param> to the reverse_lazy kwargs (so, what to put instead of <???> in the example above)?

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5 Answers

I wouldn't do this directly in the urls.py, I'd instead use the class-based RedirectView to calculate the view to redirect to:

from django.views.generic.base import RedirectView
from django.core.urlresolvers import reverse_lazy

class RedirectSomewhere(RedirectView):
    def get_redirect_url(self, param):
        return reverse_lazy('resource-view',
                            kwargs={'param': param},
                            current_app='myapp')

Then, in your urls.py you can do this:

urlpatterns = patterns('',
    url(r'^coolresource/(?P<param>\d+)/$', 
        RedirectSomewhere.as_view()),
)
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up vote 2 down vote accepted

One of the possible solutions of the general problem is to use hard-coded url pattern instead of reverse_lazy (documentation)

url(r'^coolresource/(?P<param>\d+)/$', 
                       redirect_to, 
                       {'url': '/%(param)s/resource'}
),

But, I don't like it so much, since it makes me harder after to do possible changes in urls.

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documentation link? page not found –  grgizem Oct 14 '12 at 11:17
    
@grgizem the post created half a year ago .. sorry. Anyway, i've updated the link –  gakhov Oct 15 '12 at 7:58
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You can't know or get what the value is until the view is called, so calculate url inside it.

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Django's regex matching method for urls allows one to define and assign variables:

(?P<variable_name>...) defines variable_name depending on the uri being called; so what you need to put is: param instead of <???>

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that isn't true, as you see the <???> is in kwargs of reverse_lazy –  gakhov Mar 27 '12 at 9:41
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Redirect View is great if you are using a hard coded url, it replaced redirect_to which is now deprecated. I don't think you can use it when redirecting and reversing from urls.py. Here is my solution, x is the response object in this case:

from django.core.urlresolvers import reverse
from django.http import HttpResponseRedirect
urlpatterns = patterns('',
    ....
    url(r'^coolresource/(?P<param>\d+)/$', lambda x, param: HttpResponseRedirect(reverse('myapp.views.resource', args=[param])), name='resource-view-redirect'),
    ....
)

You can still use the name of the url pattern instead of a hard coded url with this solution. The location_id parameter from the url is passed down to the lambda function.

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