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I am trying to extend the TreeViewItem to add a property. What complicates it is that it has an "Items" property that is a list of the same class type. Adding a property will require me override the children property which I do not want to do. Here is the original TreeViewItem:

public class TreeViewItem : NavigationItem<TreeViewItem>, INavigationItemContainer<TreeViewItem>, ITreeViewItem
{
    public IList<TreeViewItem> Items { get; }
}

How do I add MyProperty without being forced to override the "Items" property. A lot of things happen with the "Items" property that I do not want to recreate. Thanks for any help or advice.

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This question is not very clear. If you add a property called MyProperty, you will neither override nor hide the existing Items property. Why do you think you will be forced to override Items? –  phoog Mar 26 '12 at 21:20
    
Because I want the children of Items to have the new MyProperty. Otherwise only the top level root parent will have the property. –  TruMan1 Mar 26 '12 at 21:22
    
Aha, I get it. An answer is forthcoming. –  phoog Mar 26 '12 at 21:23
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As JaredPar suggested, you can hide the Items property with a new IList<MyExtendedTreeViewItem> Items property. This does not replace the base class's Items property, so you have to synchronize them. You could do this by implementing a (private or internal) class to wrap the base class's items collection:

class ItemsWrapper : IList<MyExtendedTreeViewItem>
{
    private IList<TreeViewItem> _baseItems;

    public ItemsWrapper(IList<TreeViewItem> baseItems)
    {
        _baseItems = baseItems;
    }

    public void Add(MyExtendedTreeViewItem item)
    {
        _baseItems.Add(item);
    }

    // much of implementation omitted here for brevity

    public MyExtendedTreeViewItem this[int index]
    {
        get { return (MyExtendedTreeViewItem)_baseItems[index]; }
        set { _baseItems[index] = value; }
    }
}

And:

class MyExtendedTreeViewItem : TreeViewItem
{
    private ItemsWrapper _items;

    public MyExtendedTreeViewItem()
    {
        _items = new ItemsWrapper(base.Items);
    }

    public new IList<MyExtendedTreeViewItem> Items { get { return _items; } }
}

This isn't entirely typesafe, because someone could get a reference to the base Items property, and then add a TreeViewItem to it, and the cast to MyExtendedTreeViewItem would throw an exception.

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It's choking on "set { _baseItems[index] = this". It says cannot convert ItemsWrapper to TreeViewItem. Seems like I can cast down but not up. –  TruMan1 Mar 26 '12 at 22:33
    
@TruMan1 That was careless typing on my part. It should be value instead of this. I have edited the post. –  phoog Mar 26 '12 at 22:37
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It sounds like you want to replace the Items property with one that has a very different definition. If so then use new

public class MyItem : TreeViewItem {
  public new List<SomethingElse> Items { 
    get { ... }
  }
}

In general using new is considered bad practice. There are specific cases where it's necessary / useful but in general it's frowned upon. A more specifically named property is often a nice middle ground for this type of behavior

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You can use an extension method and not a property, like this:

public static class TreeViewItemExtensions
{
   public static object GetPropertyValue(this TreeViewItem tvi)
   {
   }
}

No need to override anything, and you "extend" your TreeViewItem with a new method(s).

Hope this helps.

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any idea on how to "persist" new values to the object? –  TruMan1 Mar 26 '12 at 21:02
    
@TruMan1: if you're going for persistansy, extension methods are not the way to go. To be clear it's possible to manage, but it's wired, imo. It's better to override a TreeViewItem and implement properties you need in that case. –  Tigran Mar 26 '12 at 21:06
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I think you should create an extension method Like explained here -

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb383977.aspx

Instead of overriding TreeViewItem.

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Either you override it and call base.Items at the top/bottom, or you tag your version with the keyword "new", which causes your version of the method to be used only when the caller explicitly knows the object is of your new class type. It depends on your need, but the former is far more common.

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