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In the Delphi world, it was considered by some, at least, preferable to put the try AFTER a resource allocation, such as:

OracleCommand oc = new OracleCommand(query, con);
try
begin
  oc.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
  String s = oc.ExecuteScalar().ToString();
  try            
    return s;            
    except (on OracleException ex)
    begin
      ShowMessage(ex.Message);
      result := string.Empty;
    end;
end
finally
begin
  con.Close();
  con.Dispose();
end;

Is it the same in C#, or should the "try" come prior to the resource allocation:

try
{
  OracleCommand oc = new OracleCommand(query, con);
  oc.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
  String s = oc.ExecuteScalar().ToString();
  try
  {
    return s;
  }
  catch (OracleException ex)
  {
    MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
    return string.Empty;
  }
}
finally
{
  con.Close();
  con.Dispose();
}

?

share|improve this question
7  
In C#, we use using as the gods intended. –  cHao Mar 26 '12 at 21:02
    
Your try in the C# example doesn't make sense - returning a string won't ever throw an OracleException. Perhaps you mean to put more code into the try? –  Adam Mihalcin Mar 26 '12 at 21:03
    
It wasn't meant to be working code. –  B. Clay Shannon Mar 27 '12 at 2:52

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There's an even better solution: the using statement. Instead of this code, you can write the idiomatic

using (Connection con = /* some initialization logic */)
{
    try
    {
        using (OracleCommand oc = new OracleCommand(query, con))
        {
            oc.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
            return oc.ExecuteScalar().ToString();
        } // oc is automatically disposed here
    }
    catch (OracleException ex)
    {
        MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
        return string.Empty;
    }
} // con is automatically disposed here
share|improve this answer
5  
OracleCommand also implements IDisposable. –  user7116 Mar 26 '12 at 21:02
1  
+1 - Anyway, why not "using" OracleCommand too? :) I always do –  djechelon Mar 26 '12 at 21:03

In your C#, get rid of your inner try, it is unnescessary as I've never seen a return ever fail like that. You can also use a using statement for your disposable types, it will call Dispose even if an exception occurs.

try
{
    using(OracleCommand oc = new OracleCommand(query, con))
    {
        oc.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
        String s = oc.ExecuteScalar().ToString();

        return s;
    }
}
catch (OracleException ex)
{
    // either do something meaningful here, or fail hard
    MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
    throw;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1, both returns would never fail :) –  user7116 Mar 26 '12 at 21:18

The correct approach would be to place resource acquisitions inside using-blocks:

try
{
    // omit the OracleConnection using if you receive it from elsewhere
    using (OracleConnection con = new OracleConnection(...))
    using (OracleCommand oc = new OracleCommand(query, con))
    {
        oc.CommandType = CommandType.Text;

        // nothing was going to be thrown with just 'return s'
        return oc.ExecuteScalar().ToString();
    }
}
catch (OracleException ex)
{
    MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
}

return string.Empty;
share|improve this answer

Any statement that could potentially fail should be within the try block, and that definitely includes a database connection. The decision of where to put this has nothing to do with resource allocation and disposal.

As long as any object that implements IDisposable is disposed appropriately, then you have done your job. This an be via explicit syntax with a try/finally block:

OracleConnection con;
try {
    con = new OracleConnection();
    // Do stuff here.
} catch {
    // Handle errors here.
} finally {
    if (con != null)
        con.Dispose();
}

Or a using statement:

using (var con = new OracleConnection()) {
    // Do stuff here.
}

The using statement is translated to a try/finally block. If you want a catch block, however, you will need to either fall back to the first style or put an inner try/catch block within your using, which is probably more overhead but in most cases unnoticable.

share|improve this answer
    
The reason it was above the try in Delphi (or could be) was that if the allocation failed, it would be disposed of anyway, with the component's internal code, I guess. –  B. Clay Shannon Mar 27 '12 at 2:55

Is this some people as in competent ones?

You did that in delphi for the same reason you'd do it in c#.

If creating an instance of oracle comnmand throws an exception, your finally is going to execute and throw another one because your instance is null, or worse still garbage.

Naff all to do with using as such, except for if you were doing that you would n't need to close and dispose. If you had DoSomethingElse(); in there, managed and unmanaged considerations enter the bin.

share|improve this answer

No, would be enough in this case to have only one try/catch, like:

 try
   {
        OracleCommand oc = new OracleCommand(query, con);
        oc.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
        return  oc.ExecuteScalar().ToString();

    }
    catch (OracleException ex)
    {
        MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
        return string.Empty;
    }
    }
    finally
    {
      con.Close();
      con.Dispose();
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
Sort of skipped past the point there, by not adding the code to instance con, which would be outside the try finally block and then been a definitive answer. –  Tony Hopkinson Mar 26 '12 at 21:40
    
Correct, I was just showing the idea and not concrete code. –  Tigran Mar 27 '12 at 5:40

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