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I want to pause 1 second for every time it loops, it is usually easy to do similar pauses on other cases, but when working with loops, it seems it get harder:

for (var i=0 ; i < 10 ; i++) {
    document.write (i + "<br>");
    // I want to wait 1 second here
}

This is one example of my thousands failed attempts:

function writeMsg (index) {
    document.write (index + "<br>");
}

for (var i=0 ; i < 10 ; i++) {
    setTimeout (writeMsg(i), 1000);
}

Any ideas of how to get this to work?

share|improve this question
2  
    
Actually his main problem is the fact that he calls writeMsg(i) immediately instead of passing a function to setTimeout... – ThiefMaster Mar 26 '12 at 21:56
1  
@MДΓΓБДLL suprisingly though not a lot of those get proper answers :s... – sg3s Mar 26 '12 at 22:24
up vote 7 down vote accepted

This function works more like a normal for loop while it isn't

You need to take into account that a for gets 3 arguments inbetween semicolons.

  1. Before starting (ie var i=0 you define a variable)
  2. A condition before running the code again (ie i < 10 while i is under 10)
  3. An action everytime it finishes the code again (i++ add one to i)

Code

(function() {
    // Define a variable
    var i = 0,
        action = function() {
            // Condition to run again
            if (i < 10) {
                document.write(i + "<br>");

                // Add one to i
                i++;
                setTimeout(action, 1000);
            }
        };

    setTimeout(action, 1000);
})();

Here is a jsfiddle for this code demonstrating its working: http://jsfiddle.net/sg3s/n9BNQ/

share|improve this answer
    
My code can be simplified by just wrapping that if arround the new setTimeout instead of the whole function, I guess. – sg3s Mar 26 '12 at 22:11
    
Its not an actuall sleep but its good – themis Dec 4 '14 at 5:13

You pass the return value of a function call to setTimeout instead of a function. Try the following code:

for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    (function(i) {
        setTimeout(function() {
            writeMsg(i);
        }, 1000*i);
    })(i);
}

In case you wonder why the call is wrapped inside an anonymous function: Without that function each setTimeout callback would receive the same i so when the callbacks fire it would always be 10. The anonymous function creates a new i inside that is not connected to the loop variable.

share|improve this answer
    
they get printed all at the same time (Chrome) – ajax333221 Mar 26 '12 at 21:45
    
Yeah, i forgot 1000*i instead of just 1000. You probably copied the initial version. – ThiefMaster Mar 26 '12 at 21:45
    
it prints 10 every time. But I can make it work with some modifications – ajax333221 Mar 26 '12 at 21:47
    
try now. mixed up the two functions – ThiefMaster Mar 26 '12 at 21:47
1  
This just starts up x amounts of timeouts, while this works for small numbers it will be hell if you try to start too many. This also disregards the possibility to break of the for loop mid-way by setting i higher than 10. This is in my opinion a really horrible way to do this. – sg3s Mar 26 '12 at 22:01

Classic function-in-a-loop problem. One archetypal solution:

function createCallback(i) {
    return function () {
        writeMsg(i);
    };
}

function writeMsg (index) {
    document.write (index + "<br>");
}

for (var i=0 ; i < 10 ; i++) {
    setTimeout (createCallback(i), 1000*i);
}
share|improve this answer
    
You call the function immediately... – ThiefMaster Mar 26 '12 at 21:45
    
D'oh, bungled the parens. That's why I like the separate callback generator anyway - easier to write, easier to read. – Matt Ball Mar 26 '12 at 21:46
    
Bad way to do it, you start up multiple timeouts and break normal for functionality because you cannot otherwise change i to affect the other potential loops of the code. – sg3s Mar 26 '12 at 22:08
    
@sg3s I beg your pardon? Your comment is unclear. I can't say that I've ever heard of scheduling O(10) timeouts causing problems. – Matt Ball Mar 26 '12 at 23:52
    
It is bad practice. The OP didn't just want to write a message to the document but obviously preform several or the same action time after time again. Doing it this way wont allow you to intervene after you've started all the timeouts, being the beginning, while he might decide at loop #5 that it has been enough, for w/e reason, and then set i to 10... He asks for a for loop wich is delayed each loop. Not a way to fire function x y number of times with a different variable, no way of stopping what they will do. – sg3s Mar 27 '12 at 6:05

The 10 timeouts are all based on the time that setTimeout() is called. So, they are all triggered at the same time.

for (var i=0; i < 10; i++) {
    (function(idx){
        setTimeout(function(){
            document.write(idx+"<br/>");
        },1000*idx);
    })(i);
};
share|improve this answer
    
Bad way to do it, you start up multiple timeouts and break normal for functionality because you cannot otherwise change i to affect the other potential loops of the code. – sg3s Mar 26 '12 at 22:06

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