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Here is my current, working, query:

var lsFooterRow = from i in _context.Inventory
                  where i.ClaimId == claimID
                  && i.Taxable == false
                  group i by new { i.ClaimId }
                      into grp
                      select new
                      {
                          SumOfReplValue = grp.Sum(i => i.Price),
                          SumOfACV = grp.Sum(i => i.ACV),
                          SumOfReplCost = grp.Sum(i => i.ReplacementCost)
                      };

What I'd like to add, to make it conditional, is something like this so that it adds a filter to the base query along with ClaimID and Taxable:

if (reportType == "R")
            lsFooterRow = lsFooterRow.Where(i => i.ReplCost > 0);

This is not working because is does not recognize ReplCost, only SumOfReplValue, SumOfACV and SumOfReplCost.

Can someone please tell me, without doing the query in two steps, a way to add this condition? If there is no way to do it, a two step approach would be greatly appreciated :-)

Thanks in Advance!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If I understand correctly, you should probably break out intial query into multiple pieces.

  var lsFooterRow = from i in _context.Inventory
              where i.ClaimId == claimID
              && i.Taxable == false
              select i;

  // conditional where
  if (reportType == "R")
        lsFooterRow = lsFooterRow.Where(i => i.ReplacementCost > 0);


  var aggregateFooterRow =  from i in lsFooterRow
         group i by new { i.ClaimId }
                  into grp
                  select new
                  {
                      SumOfReplValue = grp.Sum(i => i.Price),
                      SumOfACV = grp.Sum(i => i.ACV),
                      SumOfReplCost = grp.Sum(i => i.ReplacementCost)
                  };

That way you are filtering on the replacement cost before it gets aggregated, which sounds like what you want to do.

You did express concerns about a two part query but that shouldn't really pose a problem. The nice thing about this is it will not compose and execute the sql until you enumerate over the final version of the query. The entity framework engine is smart enough to simply add the second where as another condition in the final where statement in SQL. That means that your contitional where will neatly be part of the query rather than an afterthought. You can break up the query and add conditional things as much as you want.

The ability to break up the query into multiple pieces and conditionally compose the query is a tremendous benefit that LINQ has over SQL.

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When a group is made, the projected type is changed also, so there needs another variable instead of lsFooterRow –  Adrian Iftode Mar 26 '12 at 22:12
    
@AdrianIftode Good catch, I just kind of threw that together. I have fixed it. –  Devin Mar 26 '12 at 22:15
    
@Devin, thank you, this works wonderfully for me. It's not as "neat" as I was hoping, but in light of how efficient it works, as you stated, it's a fine solution. It's a great "two step" method to groups that allow for flexibility without sacrificing performance, bravo! –  Larry Pittman Mar 27 '12 at 20:22

@Devin's answer is probably cleanest and makes an important pedant point about the delayed execution of linq and how 2 steps doesn't mean two queries. That being said, if you want to do it in one query, you could write the first query to include the extra condition like so:

var lsFooterRow = from i in _context.Inventory
                  where i.ClaimId == claimID
                  && i.Taxable == false
                  && (i.ReplacementCost > 0 || reportType != "R")
                  group i by new { i.ClaimId }
                      into grp
                      select new
                      {
                          SumOfReplValue = grp.Sum(i => i.Price),
                          SumOfACV = grp.Sum(i => i.ACV),
                          SumOfReplCost = grp.Sum(i => i.ReplacementCost)
                      };

EDIT: Hmm, the only thing I can think of that would make this fail, and @Devin's work, is if you're changing the value of reportType between this declaration and where ever the actual enumeration of lsFooterRow is occurring. If this is happening, you can always just .ToList() it immediately. Or, less resource intensively, copy the reportType to a temporary variable that is never changed, and reference that within your query instead.

string _reportType = reportType //only set here, nowhere else
var lsFooterRow = from i in _context.Inventory
                  where i.ClaimId == claimID
                  && i.Taxable == false
                  && (i.ReplacementCost > 0 || _reportType != "R")
                  group i by new { i.ClaimId }
                      into grp
                      select new
                      {
                          SumOfReplValue = grp.Sum(i => i.Price),
                          SumOfACV = grp.Sum(i => i.ACV),
                          SumOfReplCost = grp.Sum(i => i.ReplacementCost)
                      };

But now it's no longer as clean, and captures the _reportType variable unnecessarily within the closure.

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I tried this and it would not work for me, "as is". I tried this first, because I love how succinct it is. When reportType != "R", it came back as a null set and since Devin's was plug and play I just went with that. I've spent too much time on this as it is. I appreciate your effort and time. –  Larry Pittman Mar 27 '12 at 20:25

if you know what sql query needs to be executed at the DB...you can try http://www.linqpad.net/ which I feel is pretty handy when u work with linq...

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I love linqpad, thanks! –  Larry Pittman Mar 27 '12 at 20:49

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