Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am running 32-bit Windows 7 and Python 2.7.

I am trying to write a command line Python script that can run from CMD. I am trying to assign a value to sys.argv[1]. The aim of my script is to calculate the MD5 hash value of a file. This file will be inputted when the script is invoked in the command line and so, sys.argv[1] should represent the file to be hashed.

Here's my code below:

import sys
import hashlib

filename = sys.argv[1]

def md5Checksum(filePath):
    fh = open(filePath, 'rb')
    m = hashlib.md5()
    while True:
        data = fh.read(8192)
        if not data:
            break
        m.update(data)
    return m.hexdigest()

# print len(sys.argv)
print 'The MD5 checksum of text.txt is', md5Checksum(filename)

Whenver I run this script, I receive an error:

filename = sys.argv[1]
IndexError: list index out of range

To call my script, I have been writing "script.py test.txt" for example. Both the script and the source file are in the same directory. I have tested len(sys.argv) and it only comes back as containing one value, that being the python script name.

Any suggestions? I can only assume it is how I am invoking the code through CMD

share|improve this question
    
You have a dangling open file handle there. Use with open(filePath, 'rb') as fh: instead. –  wim Mar 27 '12 at 0:11
    
see stackoverflow.com/questions/2640971/… for more info –  laike9m Dec 13 '13 at 17:06
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

try to run the script using python script.py test.txt, you might have a broken association of the interpreter with the .py extention.

share|improve this answer
    
@fastreload, it is bound, but only the script name is passed to the interpreter, the rest of the parameters are skipped, which is a broken association –  newtover Mar 26 '12 at 22:25
    
Thanks. It seemed I did indeed have a broken association. I followed the example below and it worked a treat:- voidspace.org.uk/python/articles/command_line.shtml –  thefragileomen Mar 27 '12 at 19:35
add comment

You should check that in your registry the way you have associated the files is correct, for example:

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Applications\python.exe\shell\open\command]
@="\"C:\\Python27\\python.exe\" \"%1\" %*"
share|improve this answer
add comment

Did you try sys.argv[0]? If len(sys.argv) = 0 then sys.argv[1] would try to access the second and nonexistent item

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.