Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it possible to in someway indicate if an Array in Perl is undefined or null? I find myself coming across situations where I would like to be able to differentiate between an empty array and one that hasn't been populated yet (or failed to populate for some reason).

So for instance, with an array reference I can do this:

my $apples;
$apples = get_apples();
if(defined $apples){

if(scalar @$apples == 0){
# We successfully got the list of apples, but there were none
}

}else{

# There was a problem getting the list of apples

}

My only complaint about this is that "my $apples" doesn't tell you that $apples is intended to be an array reference, so @apples would be more specific.

It doesn't look there is a way to do something with an array explicitly, is that the case? Will another variable always be required to indicate if the array was successfully populated?

my @apples;
(@apples) = get_apples();

Could never be tested for a successful return of apples, right? Or am I missing something neat?

Edit: I know that get_apples could both return a success and a list to populate the array with, but I'm curious if there is a way to indicate a null or undefined value with just an array.

share|improve this question
    
I'm not sure that's what you're asking, but Perl considers an empty array to be the failure value. –  Neil Mar 26 '12 at 23:03
1  
@Neil "False" is not synonymous with "failure". –  Schwern Mar 26 '12 at 23:09
1  
I differentiate between someone telling me "There were no results matching your criteria" and "500 Internal Server Error" :P –  GoldenNewby Mar 26 '12 at 23:14
    
show get_apples. it could return undef to indicate a failure, perhaps? –  ysth Mar 27 '12 at 3:07
    
@Schwern What makes you think I said it was? –  Neil Mar 27 '12 at 20:47

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In Perl there is no difference between an empty array and an uninitialized array.

$ perl -MDevel::Peek -e 'print Dump(\@a)'
SV = RV(0x20033b00) at 0x20033af0
  REFCNT = 1
  FLAGS = (TEMP,ROK)
  RV = 0x20091830
  SV = PVAV(0x200350c0) at 0x20091830
    REFCNT = 2
    FLAGS = ()
    ARRAY = 0x0
    FILL = -1
    MAX = -1
    ARYLEN = 0x0
    FLAGS = (REAL)

$ perl -MDevel::Peek -e '@a=(); print Dump(\@a)'
SV = RV(0x20033b00) at 0x20033af0
  REFCNT = 1
  FLAGS = (TEMP,ROK)
  RV = 0x20091818
  SV = PVAV(0x200350c0) at 0x20091818
    REFCNT = 2
    FLAGS = ()
    ARRAY = 0x0
    FILL = -1
    MAX = -1
    ARYLEN = 0x0
    FLAGS = (REAL)

Your only hope may be to inspect the MAX attribute of the internal AV object to see whether an array used to contain any data:

use B;
@b = ();
@c = (1..100); @c = ();
print B::svref_2object(\@b)->MAX;      # -1
print B::svref_2object(\@c)->MAX;      # 99
share|improve this answer
    
I love your answer, but I hate that now I will start Peeking at things. –  GoldenNewby Mar 26 '12 at 23:15
    
Subs can't return arrays, so what's this @a you inspect? –  ikegami Mar 27 '12 at 0:34
    
@ikegami If that's intended as a list vs array thing, that is unhelpfully obtuse and pedantic. Clear explanation or leave it alone. –  Schwern Mar 28 '12 at 1:31
    
@Schwern, I don't see how the above can possibly tell whether get_apples returned an error or not. The OP is trying to distinguis my @apples = get_apples(); # Empty list because of error from my @apples = get_apples(); # Empty list without error yet both result in my @apples = (); So what's the other array mob is dumping? –  ikegami Mar 28 '12 at 20:06
1  
@mob, MAX might not be -1 even immediately after my @a. perl -MB -E'for (1..2) { my @a; @a = (4,5,6) if $_ == 1; say B::svref_2object(\@a)->MAX; }' –  ikegami Mar 28 '12 at 20:12
  • Is it possible to in someway indicate if an Array in Perl is undefined or null?

No. Arrays can only be empty or contain scalars.

There is a better way to do what you want: throw an exception. Separating error codes and return values have been a bugaboo since the days of C. It complicates using the function and leads to let more errors. Exceptions handily solve this problem AND you don't have to pepper your code with error checking (or more likely forget to).

sub get_apples {
    ...
    die "How do you like them apples?" if $it_didnt_work;
    return @apples;
}

# If get_apples() fails, the program throws an error.  Good, that
# should be the default behavior.
my @apples = get_apples();

# Or maybe you want to do something with the error.
my @apples = eval { get_apples() };
if( $@ ) {
    ...handle the error...
}
share|improve this answer
2  
+1, but aren't these still the days of C? –  GoldenNewby Mar 26 '12 at 23:16
    
This does a good job of showing how to use exceptions in perl: c2.com/cgi/wiki?ExceptionHandlingInPerl –  slm Sep 4 '13 at 1:54

The reason why you can do my $apples;, populate @$apples in the get_apples() subroutine, and later do if(@$apples==0) is because of the autovivification of scalars.

As mob points out, this doesn't work for arrays.

A way around this might be to have get_apples() pass a hash reference (or, if you want to be more Enterprisey, a GetAppleReturn object) that, in pseudocode, looks like

{
  success=>1,# or 0 if it failed
  apples=>[$apple1,$apple2,...] #array reference of apples
}

So, then you could do:

my @apples;
my $rv=get_apples();
if($rv->{success})
{
  if(scalar(@{$rv->{apples}})==0)
  {
    print "Success, but no apples.\n";
  }
  else
  {
    #do whatever
  }
}
else
{
  print "There was a problem getting the apples.  How do ya like them apples?\n";
}
share|improve this answer

How about using ref()?

my $apples;

print 'what type of object is $apples? ' . ref($apples) . $/;

$apples = get_apples();

print 'what type of object is $apples now? ' . ref($apples) . $/;

sub get_apples {
    my $empty_apple_array = [];
    return $empty_apple_array;
}

when $apples is first created ref() returns nothing because it's not a reference to anything yet.

Then we make it a reference to an empty array. Now ref() knows it's an array reference, even if it's empty.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, but the problem isn't how to handle this with references, it's how it would be handled with an array. –  GoldenNewby Mar 27 '12 at 3:10

You could return a single-element array containing an undef value to signify an error, then test like this:

my @apples = get_apples();
if (@apples) {
    if (defined $apples[0]) {
        # you have apples
    } else {
        # some error occurred
    }
} else {
    # no apples
}
share|improve this answer

Even if Perl could tell the difference between uninitialised and an empty array (which it can't), it wouldn't help you determine if get_apples returned an error because you would have no way of making my @apples = get_apples() not do the assignment when an error occurred.

You might be under the misconption that return @a returns an array. Subs cannot return arrays. They can only return 0 or more scalars. return @a returns the result of @a, which is the contents of the array in list context.

There's is no way to distinguish zero elements returned due to an error from a successful response of zero elements through the returned values. (You could use an out-of-band channel such as an exception or a global variable, of course.)

Since subs can only return a list of scalars, there is only two things you can do:

  • Count the number of scalar returned.
  • Inspect the scalars returned.

In order to achieve your goal, you need to find a case where one of these differs for an error and for success.

When returning an array ref, one inspects if the returned value is defined or not.

You could do something similar if the first value returned (if any) on success will always be defined, but it's pretty ugly.

sub apples {
    if (...error...) {
       return undef;
    } else {
        return ...;
    }
}

my @apples = apples();
if (@apples && !defined($apples[0])) {
   ... an error occurred...
}

I recommend against that.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.