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I have seen it asserted several times now that the following code is not allowed by the C++ Standard:

int array[5];
int *array_begin = &array[0];
int *array_end = &array[5];

Is &array[5] legal C++ code in this context?

I would like an answer with a reference to the Standard if possible.

It would also be interesting to know if it meets the C standard. And if it isn't standard C++, why was the decision made to treat it differently from array + 5 or &array[4] + 1?

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I think treating it differently would require bounds checking, so I am sure it is legal. But that's based on logic rather than empirical testing or the standard. –  Brian Jun 12 '09 at 18:11
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@Brian: Nope, it would only require bounds checking if the runtime was required to catch the error. To avoid that, the standard can simply say "not allowed". It's undefined behavior at its finest. You're not allowed to do it, and the runtime and compiler aren't required to tell you if you do it. –  jalf Jun 12 '09 at 18:16
    
Ok, just to clarify a bit, because the title misled me: A pointer one past the end of an array is not out-of-bounds. Out of bounds pointers are not allowed in general, but the standard is a lot more lenient with one-past-the-end pointers. You might want to edit the title if you're specifically asking about one-past-the-end pointers. If you want to know about out of bounds pointers in general, you should edit your example. ;) –  jalf Jun 12 '09 at 18:45
    
He's not asking about pointers one past in general. He's asking about using the & operator to get the pointer. –  Matthew Flaschen Jun 12 '09 at 18:48
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@Matthew: But the answer to that depends on where that pointer points to. You're allowed to take the address in the one-past-the-end case, but not in an out-of-bounds case. –  jalf Jun 12 '09 at 18:52

14 Answers 14

up vote 23 down vote accepted

Your example is legal, but only because you're not actually using an out of bounds pointer. Let's deal with out of bounds pointers first: (because that's how I originally interpreted your question, before I noticed that the example uses a one-past-the-end pointer instead ;))

In general, you're not even allowed to create an out-of-bounds pointer. A pointer must point to an element within the array, or one past the end. Nowhere else.

The pointer is not even allowed to exist, which means you're obviously not allowed to dereference it either. ;)

Here's what the standard has to say on the subject:

5.7:5:

When an expression that has integral type is added to or subtracted from a pointer, the result has the type of the pointer operand. If the pointer operand points to an element of an array object, and the array is large enough, the result points to an element offset from the original element such that the difference of the subscripts of the resulting and original array elements equals the integral expression. In other words, if the expression P points to the i-th element of an array object, the expressions (P)+N (equivalently, N+(P)) and (P)-N (where N has the value n) point to, respectively, the i+n-th and i−n-th elements of the array object, provided they exist. Moreover, if the expression P points to the last element of an array object, the expression (P)+1 points one past the last element of the array object, and if the expression Q points one past the last element of an array object, the expression (Q)-1 points to the last element of the array object. If both the pointer operand and the result point to elements of the same array object, or one past the last element of the array object, the evaluation shall not produce an overflow; otherwise, the behavior is undefined.

(emphasis mine)

Of course, this is for operator+. So just to be sure, here's what the standard says about array subscripting:

5.2.1:1:

The expression E1[E2] is identical (by definition) to *((E1)+(E2))

Of course, there's an obvious caveat: Your example doesn't actually show an out-of-bounds pointer. it uses a "one past the end" pointer, which is different. The pointer is allowed to exist (as the above says), but the standard, as far as I can see, says nothing about dereferencing it. The closest I can find is 3.9.2:3:

[Note: for instance, the address one past the end of an array (5.7) would be considered to point to an unrelated object of the array’s element type that might be located at that address. —end note ]

Which seems to me to imply that yes, you can legally dereference it, but the result of reading or writing to the location is unspecified.

Thanks to ilproxyil for correcting the last bit here, answering the last part of your question:

  • array + 5 doesn't actually dereference anything, it simply creates a pointer to one past the end of array.
  • &array[4] + 1 dereferences array+4 (which is perfectly safe), takes the address of that lvalue, and adds one to that address, which results in a one-past-the-end pointer (but that pointer never gets dereferenced.
  • &array[5] dereferences array+5 (which as far as I can see is legal, and results in "an unrelated object of the array’s element type", as the above said), and then takes the address of that element, which also seems legal enough.

So they don't do quite the same thing, although in this case, the end result is the same.

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this pointer he is trying to create is one past the end... –  Evan Teran Jun 12 '09 at 18:24
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&array[5] is pointing to one past. However, this is not a legal way to get that address. –  Matthew Flaschen Jun 12 '09 at 18:27
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agreed, I would say &array[5] is UB. (even though it may work as expected in practice). –  Evan Teran Jun 12 '09 at 18:30
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the last sentence is incorrect. "array + 5" and "&array[4] + 1" do NOT dereference one past the end, while array[5] DOES. (i also assume you meant &array[5], but the comment still stands). The first two simply point one past the end. –  user83255 Jun 12 '09 at 18:52
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@jalf that note - i think it merely wants to say that "a + sizeof a" is equally valid to "&b" if b is directly allocated after the array "a", and that the resulting addresses equally "point to" the same object. Not more. Remember that all notes are informative (non-normative): If it would state such fundamental important facts like that there are objects after an array object that are located at the past-the-end, then such rule would need to be made normative –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 12 '09 at 22:21

Yes, it's legal. From the C99 draft standard:

§6.5.2.1, paragraph 2:

A postfix expression followed by an expression in square brackets [] is a subscripted designation of an element of an array object. The definition of the subscript operator [] is that E1[E2] is identical to (*((E1)+(E2))). Because of the conversion rules that apply to the binary + operator, if E1 is an array object (equivalently, a pointer to the initial element of an array object) and E2 is an integer, E1[E2] designates the E2-th element of E1 (counting from zero).

§6.5.3.2, paragraph 3 (emphasis mine):

The unary & operator yields the address of its operand. If the operand has type ‘‘type’’, the result has type ‘‘pointer to type’’. If the operand is the result of a unary * operator, neither that operator nor the & operator is evaluated and the result is as if both were omitted, except that the constraints on the operators still apply and the result is not an lvalue. Similarly, if the operand is the result of a [] operator, neither the & operator nor the unary * that is implied by the [] is evaluated and the result is as if the & operator were removed and the [] operator were changed to a + operator. Otherwise, the result is a pointer to the object or function designated by its operand.

§6.5.6, paragraph 8:

When an expression that has integer type is added to or subtracted from a pointer, the result has the type of the pointer operand. If the pointer operand points to an element of an array object, and the array is large enough, the result points to an element offset from the original element such that the difference of the subscripts of the resulting and original array elements equals the integer expression. In other words, if the expression P points to the i-th element of an array object, the expressions (P)+N (equivalently, N+(P)) and (P)-N (where N has the value n) point to, respectively, the i+n-th and i−n-th elements of the array object, provided they exist. Moreover, if the expression P points to the last element of an array object, the expression (P)+1 points one past the last element of the array object, and if the expression Q points one past the last element of an array object, the expression (Q)-1 points to the last element of the array object. If both the pointer operand and the result point to elements of the same array object, or one past the last element of the array object, the evaluation shall not produce an overflow; otherwise, the behavior is undefined. If the result points one past the last element of the array object, it shall not be used as the operand of a unary * operator that is evaluated.

Note that the standard explicitly allows pointers to point one element past the end of the array, provided that they are not dereferenced. By 6.5.2.1 and 6.5.3.2, the expression &array[5] is equivalent to &*(array + 5), which is equivalent to (array+5), which points one past the end of the array. This does not result in a dereference (by 6.5.3.2), so it is legal.

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Interesting, so it's legal and explicitly well defined in C which may be different from C++ (see other discussions!). –  Charles Bailey Jun 12 '09 at 19:32
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He explicitly asked about C++. This is the kind of subtle difference that can not be relied when porting between the two. –  Matthew Flaschen Jun 12 '09 at 21:34
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He asked about both: "It would also be interesting to know if it meets the C standard." –  Charles Bailey Jun 12 '09 at 21:42
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@Matthew Flaschen: The C++ standard incorporates the C standard by reference. Annex C.2 contains a list of changes (incompatibilities between ISO C and ISO C++), and none of the changes relate to these clauses. Hence, &array[5] is legal in C and C++. –  Adam Rosenfield Jun 12 '09 at 22:00
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The C standard is a normative reference in the C++ standard. That means that provisions in the C standard that are referenced by the C++ standard are part of the C++ standard. It does not mean that everything in the C standard applies. In particular Annex C is informative, not normative, so just because a difference isn't highlighted in this section doesn't mean that the C 'version' applies to C++. –  Charles Bailey Jun 12 '09 at 22:20

It is legal.

According to the gcc documentation for C++, &array[5] is legal. In both C++ and in C you may safely address the element one past the end of an array - you will get a valid pointer. So &array[5] as an expression is legal.

However, it is still undefined behavior to attempt to dereference pointers to unallocated memory, even if the pointer points to a valid address. So attempting to dereference the pointer generated by that expression is still undefined behavior (i.e. illegal) even though the pointer itself is valid.

In practice, I imagine it would usually not cause a crash, though.

Edit: By the way, this is generally how the end() iterator for STL containers is implemented (as a pointer to one-past-the-end), so that's a pretty good testament to the practice being legal.

Edit: Oh, now I see you're not really asking if holding a pointer to that address is legal, but if that exact way of obtaining the pointer is legal. I'll defer to the other answerers on that.

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I'd say you're correct, if and only if the C++ spec does not say that &* must be treated as a no-op. I'd imagine it probably does not say that. –  Tyler McHenry Jun 12 '09 at 18:33
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he page you reference (correctly) says that it is legal to point one past the end. &array[5], technically first dereferences (array + 5), then references it again. So it technically is like this: (&*(array + 5)). Fortunately, compiler are smart enough to know that &* can be factored to nothing. However, they don't have to do that, therefore, I'd say it is UB. –  Evan Teran Jun 12 '09 at 18:34
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@Evan: There's more to this. Check out the last line of core issue 232: std.dkuug.dk/JTC1/SC22/WG21/docs/cwg_active.html#232. The last example there just looks wrong - but they clearly explain that the distinction is on the "lvalue-to-rvalue" conversion, which in this case doesn't take place. –  Richard Corden Jun 12 '09 at 18:44
    
@Richard: interesting, seems there is some debate on the subject. I'd even agree that it should be allowed :-P. –  Evan Teran Jun 12 '09 at 18:46
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It's is the same kind of undefined behavior as is the "reference-to-NULL" thing people kept discussing about and where seemingly all voted up the answer saying "it is undefined behavior" –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 12 '09 at 19:21

Just to put it all together and so we can compare the different ideas that arose in the different answers. I'll comment on what i think about the stuff. Community wiki, because this is merely a collection of other people's thoughts :) All emphasis are put by me below.

First, we have to concern whether the pointer to one past the last element refers to an object. An array of bound N has N sub-objects that are its elements, as explained in 8.3.4/1

An object of array type contains a contiguously allocated non-empty set of N sub-objects of type T. - 8.3.4/1

To my knowledge, there is no mention in the Standard about an object located just after an array. If there is such an object, we are allowed to dereference the pointer that points one past the end, because of the following text and clarifying note

If an object of type T is located at an address A, a pointer of type cv T* whose value is the address A is said to point to that object, regardless of how the value was obtained. [Note: for instance, the address one past the end of an array (5.7) would be considered to point to an unrelated object of the array’s element type that might be located at that address. ] - 3.9.2/3

This is meant to say that the following is well defined, if the implementation lays the objects in a way that the storage of b is allocated directly behind the array object (which you can get manually if you overallocate some chunk of memory using malloc, assigning to a pointer to an array having a smaller size - i will keep it simple and only illustrate using the following example)

int a[3], b;
*(a + 3) = 0;
assert(b == 0 && (a + 3 == &b) && a[3] == 0);

Consent on a few people is that your shown expression, &array[5], is undefined behavior. This is based on the fact, which stands, that the Standard says at 3.10/2 and 5.3.1/1

An lvalue refers to an object or function. - 3.10/2

The unary * operator performs indirection: the expression to which it is applied shall be a pointer to an object type, or a pointer to a function type and the result is an lvalue referring to the object or function to which the expression points. - 5.3.1/1

Above, we've seen that we are not guaranteed that there is an object (of the same type) after the last element of an array allocated. This should be kept different from another case, which happens when you have an object allocated (memory reserved), but that object has not started lifetime yet, as it happens if you allocate memory with malloc, and are going to placement-new an object into that area: Then you are allowed to dereference the area before you invoke the constructor, as long as you happen to keep some simple rules, like not trying to read a value out of the generated lvalue (3.8/5 and 3.8/6)

The interesting thing is, what happens when the lvalue does not refer to an object? Remember that an lvalue has to refer to an object (or function).

The Standard draws this operation well-defined at 5.2.8/2 talking about the typeid operator, which evaluates lvalue expression operands.

If the lvalue expression is obtained by applying the unary * operator to a pointer and the pointer is a null pointer value (4.10), the typeid expression throws the bad_typeid exception. - 5.3.1/1

This is contrary to 3.10/2, which requires that an lvalue expression refers to an object/function, which a null pointer value does not refer to. At this point, we have got a defect in the Standard: One place allows to de-reference a null pointer in a way that contradicts another part of the Standard. This was observed long ago, and is being discussed in the linked issue report. As the one guy there notes, it's just handling dereferenced null special, to circumvent the lvalue-without-object problem. Since it starts out with talking about an lvalue, it's at least a problematic way for handling that currently.

The idea to generally handle this, is to introduce an empty lvalue that purposely refers to no object or function. If we try to read a value out of it, we get undefined behavior. As long as we don't, we do not. Dereferencing a past-the-end address could yield such an empty lvalue, as we can't be sure usually whether there is an object located or not.

However, as the discussions on that report indicates, there are still outstanding issues (like, what happens with our overallocating case?) before it can be incorporated into the Standard.

Conclusion

I believe there is neither a right nor a wrong way about it. While i have the slight tendency to view this as generally undefined behavior, because there is no lvalue that doesn't refer to an object, i also see the current quite problematic way of typeid handling with this problem. Since this concerns an active issue in the Standard, the best you could do is doing an addition to get the pointer value, instead of dereferencing past-the-end, thus avoiding the problem altogether.

Note that all the above is no problem in C. C makes it all well-formed by saying &* is next to a no-op but just making a pointer into an rvalue, thus you can't do

(&*a) = NULL;

The same simple thing, sadly, isn't true about C++, though.

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I believe that this is legal, and it depends on the 'lvalue to rvalue' conversion taking place. The last line Core issue 232 has the following:

We agreed that the approach in the standard seems okay: p = 0; *p; is not inherently an error. An lvalue-to-rvalue conversion would give it undefined behavior

Although this is slightly different example, what it does show is that the '*' does not result in lvalue to rvalue conversion and so, given that the expression is the immediate operand of '&' which expects an lvalue then the behaviour is defined.

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+1 for the interesting link. I'm still not sure that I agree that p=0;*p; is well defined as I'm not convinced that '*' is well defined for an expression whose value is not a pointer to an actual object. –  Charles Bailey Jun 12 '09 at 19:25
    
A statement that's an expression is legal, and means to evaluate that expression. *p is an expression that invokes undefined behavior, so anything the implementation does is according to the standard (including emailing your boss, or downloading baseball statistics). –  David Thornley Jun 12 '09 at 22:01

In addition to the above answers, I'll point out operator& can be overridden for classes. So even if it was valid for PODs, it probably isn't a good idea to do for an object you know isn't valid (much like overriding operator&() in the first place).

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+1 on bringing operator& into discussion, even if experts recommend never overriding it as some STL containers depend on it returning a pointer into the element. It is one of those things that got into the standard before they knew better. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 12 '09 at 19:28

I don't believe that it is illegal, but I do believe that the behaviour of &array[5] is undefined.

  • 5.2.1 [expr.sub] E1[E2] is identical (by definition) to *((E1)+(E2))

  • 5.3.1 [expr.unary.op] unary * operator ... the result is an lvalue referring to the object or function to which the expression points.

At this point you have undefined behaviour because the expression ((E1)+(E2)) didn't actually point to an object and the standard does say what the result should be unless it does.

  • 1.3.12 [defns.undefined] Undefined behaviour may also be expected when this International Standard omits the description of any explicit definition of behaviour.

As noted elsewhere, array + 5 and &array[0] + 5 are valid and well defined ways of obtaining a pointer one beyond the end of array.

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The key point is: "the result of '*' is an lvalue". From what I can tell, it only becomes UB iff you have an lvalue to rvalue conversion on that result. –  Richard Corden Jun 12 '09 at 18:41
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I would contend that as the result of '*' is only defined in terms of the object to which the expression to which the operator is applied, then it is undefined - by omission - what the result is if the expression didn't have a value which actually referred to an object. It's far from clear, though. –  Charles Bailey Jun 12 '09 at 18:52

This is legal:

int array[5];
int *array_begin = &array[0];
int *array_end = &array[5];

Section 5.2.1 Subscripting The expression E1[E2] is identical (by definition) to *((E1)+(E2))

So by this we can say that array_end is equivalent too:

int *array_end = &(*((array) + 5)); // or &(*(array + 5))

Section 5.3.1.1 Unary operator '*': The unary * operator performs indirection: the expression to which it is applied shall be a pointer to an object type, or a pointer to a function type and the result is an lvalue referring to the object or function to which the expression points. If the type of the expression is “pointer to T,” the type of the result is “T.” [ Note: a pointer to an incomplete type (other than cv void) can be dereferenced. The lvalue thus obtained can be used in limited ways (to initialize a reference, for example); this lvalue must not be converted to an rvalue, see 4.1. — end note ]

The important part of the above:

'the result is an lvalue referring to the object or function'.

The unary operator '*' is returning a lvalue referring to the int (no de-refeference). The unary operator '&' then gets the address of the lvalue.

As long as there is no de-referencing of an out of bounds pointer then the operation is fully covered by the standard and all behavior is defined. So by my reading the above is completely legal.

The fact that a lot of the STL algorithms depend on the behavior being well defined, is a sort of hint that the standards committee has already though of this and I am sure there is a something that covers this explicitly.

The comment section below presents two arguments:

(please read: but it is long and both of us end up trollish)

Argument 1

this is illegal because of section 5.7 paragraph 5

When an expression that has integral type is added to or subtracted from a pointer, the result has the type of the pointer operand. If the pointer operand points to an element of an array object, and the array is large enough, the result points to an element offset from the original element such that the difference of the subscripts of the resulting and original array elements equals the integral expression. In other words, if the expression P points to the i-th element of an array object, the expressions (P)+N (equivalently, N+(P)) and (P)-N (where N has the value n) point to, respectively, the i + n-th and i − n-th elements of the array object, provided they exist. Moreover, if the expression P points to the last element of an array object, the expression (P)+1 points one past the last element of the array object, and if the expression Q points one past the last element of an array object, the expression (Q)-1 points to the last element of the array object. If both the pointer operand and the result point to elements of the same array object, or one past the last element of the array object, the evaluation shall not produce an overflow; otherwise, the behavior is undefined.

And though the section is relevant; it does not show undefined behavior. All the elements in the array we are talking about are either within the array or one past the end (which is well defined by the above paragraph).

Argument 2:

The second argument presented below is: * is the de-reference operator.
And though this is a common term used to describe the '*' operator; this term is deliberately avoided in the standard as the term 'de-reference' is not well defined in terms of the language and what that means to the underlying hardware.

Though accessing the memory one beyond the end of the array is definitely undefined behavior. I am not convinced the unary * operator accesses the memory (reads/writes to memory) in this context (not in a way the standard defines). In this context (as defined by the standard (see 5.3.1.1)) the unary * operator returns a lvalue referring to the object. In my understanding of the language this is not access to the underlying memory. The result of this expression is then immediately used by the unary & operator operator that returns the address of the object referred to by the lvalue referring to the object.

Many other references to Wikipedia and non canonical sources are presented. All of which I find irrelevant. C++ is defined by the standard.

Conclusion:

I am wiling to concede there are many parts of the standard that I may have not considered and may prove my above arguments wrong. NON are provided below. If you show me a standard reference that shows this is UB. I will

  1. Leave the answer.
  2. Put in all caps this is stupid and I am wrong for all to read.

This is not an argument:

Not everything in the entire world is defined by the C++ standard. Open your mind.

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According to whom? According to which passage? The * performs a dereference. It is the dereference operator. This is what it does. Arguably the fact that you then obtain a new pointer to the resulting value (using &) is irrelevant. You can't just present a sequence of evaluation, present the final expression semantics and pretend that the intermediate steps didn't happen (or that the language's rules did not apply to each). –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 6 '13 at 11:58
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I quote from the same passage: the result is an lvalue referring to the object or function to which the expression points. It is clear that if no such object exists, there is no behaviour defined for this operator. Your subsequent statement is returning a lvalue referring to the int (no de-refeference) is what makes no sense to me. Why do you think that this is not a dereference? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 6 '13 at 12:00
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It returns a reference to what is being pointed at. What is this, if not a dereference? The passage says that * performs indirection, and indirection from pointer to pointee is called dereferencing. Your argument essentially asserts that pointers and references are the same thing or, at least, implicitly linked, which is simply not true. int x = 0; int* ptr = &x; int& y = *x; Here I dereference x. I don't need to use y for that to be true. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 6 '13 at 12:04
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@LokiAstari: I have a question, what do you think "dereferencing" means if not "calling the unary * operator that returns an lvalue referring to the object to which the expression points"? (Note that the subsequent sentence of the standard does refer to this process as dereferencing in the C++11 spec) –  Mooing Duck Aug 6 '13 at 17:25
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@LokiAstari: I showed you references days and days ago; you simply refuse to acknowledge that they exist, for some reason. How you can justify this behaviour is beyond me, but you must be the one trolling. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 10 '13 at 1:11

Even if it is legal, why depart from convention? array + 5 is shorter anyway, and in my opinion, more readable.

Edit: If you want it to by symmetric you can write

int* array_begin = array; 
int* array_end = array + 5;
share|improve this answer
    
I think that the style I use in the question looks more symmetrical: the array declaration and the begin/end pointers, or sometimes I pass those directly to an STL function. That is why I use it instead of the shorter version. –  Zan Lynx Jun 12 '09 at 23:45
    
To be symmetrical I think it'd need to be array_begin = array + 0; array_end = array + 5; How's that for a long delayed comment response? –  Zan Lynx Mar 16 '10 at 18:44
    
It might be a world record :) –  rlbond Mar 16 '10 at 20:56

C++ standard, 5.19, paragraph 4:

An address constant expression is a pointer to an lvalue....The pointer shall be created explicitly, using the unary & operator...or using an expression of array (4.2)...type. The subscripting operator []...can be used in the creation of an address constant expression, but the value of an object shall not be accessed by the use of these operators. If the subscripting operator is used, one of its operands shall be an integral constant expression.

Looks to me like &array[5] is legal C++, being an address constant expression.

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I'm not sure that the original question is necessarily talking about an array with static storage. Even if it is I wonder if &array[5] isn't a address constant expression precisely because it doesn't point to an lvalue designating an object? –  Charles Bailey Jun 12 '09 at 22:28
    
I don't think it matters whether the array is static or stack-allocated. –  David Thornley Jun 13 '09 at 15:40
    
It does if your referencing 5.19. The part that you elided with ... says "... designating an object of static storage duration, a string literal or a function. ...". This means that if your expression involves a stack allocated array you can't use 5.19 to reason about the validity of those expressions. –  Charles Bailey Jun 13 '09 at 19:52

If your example is NOT a general case but a specific one, then it is allowed. You can legally, AFAIK, move one past the allocated block of memory. It does not work for a generic case though i.e where you are trying to access elements farther by 1 from the end of an array.

Just searched C-Faq : link text

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the top answer says "its legal" and I also say the same thing. Why the down vote then :). Is something wrong with my answer? –  Aditya Sehgal Jun 12 '09 at 18:40

Working draft (n2798):

"The result of the unary & operator is a pointer to its operand. The operand shall be an lvalue or a qualified-id. In the first case, if the type of the expression is “T,” the type of the result is “pointer to T.”" (p. 103)

array[5] is not a qualified-id as best I can tell (the list is on p. 87); the closest would seem to be identifier, but while array is an identifier array[5] is not. It is not an lvalue because "An lvalue refers to an object or function. " (p. 76). array[5] is obviously not a function, and is not guaranteed to refer to a valid object (because array + 5 is after the last allocated array element).

Obviously, it may work in certain cases, but it's not valid C++ or safe.

Note: It is legal to add to get one past the array (p. 113):

"if the expression P [a pointer] points to the last element of an array object, the expression (P)+1 points one past the last element of the array object, and if the expression Q points one past the last element of an array object, the expression (Q)-1 points to the last element of the array object. If both the pointer operand and the result point to elements of the same array object, or one past the last element of the array object, the evaluation shall not produce an overflow"

But it is not legal to do so using &.

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Care to explain the down-vote? –  Matthew Flaschen Jun 12 '09 at 18:40
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@jalf, the note says "that might be located at that address". It's not guaranteed that there is one located :) –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 12 '09 at 19:28
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The standard says that the result of op* must be an lvalue, but it only says what that lvalue is if the operand is a pointer which actually points to an object. That would imply (bizarrely) that if one past the end didn't happen to point at a suitable object, that the implementation would have to find a suitable lvalue from somewhere else and use that. That really would mess up &array[sizeof array]! –  Charles Bailey Jun 12 '09 at 21:49
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"However, I still think it is not an lvalue. Because there is no object guaranteed to be at array[5], array[5] can not legally /refer/ to an object." <- That is exactly why i think it is undefined behavior: It relies on some behavior not explicitly specified by the standard, and thus falls within 1.3.12[defns.undefined] –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 12 '09 at 21:58
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litb, fair enough. Let's say it's /not definitely/ an lvalue, and thus /definitely not/ 100% safe. –  Matthew Flaschen Jun 12 '09 at 22:48

It is perfectly legal.

The vector<> template class from the stl does exactly this when you call myVec.end(): it gets you a pointer (here as an iterator) which points one element past the end of the array.

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It should be undefined behaviour, for the following reasons:

  1. Trying to access out-of-bounds elements results in undefined behaviour. Hence the standard does not forbid an implementation throwing an exception in that case (i.e. an implementation checking bounds before an element is accessed). If & (array[size]) were defined to be begin (array) + size, an implementation throwing an exception in case of out-of-bound access would not conform to the standard anymore.

  2. It's impossible to make this yield end (array) if array is not an array but rather an arbitrary collection type.

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