Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I define anonymous functions in python, where the bahaviour should depend on the value of a local variable at definiton-time, and also accept arguments

Example:

def callback(val1, val2):
   print "{0} {1}".format(val1, val2)

i = 0
f0 = lambda x: callback(i, x)
i = 1
f1 = lambda x: callback(i, x)

f0(8) # prints "1, 8: but I'd like "0, 8" (value of 'i' when f0 was defined)
f1(8) # prints "1, 8"

Is something like this possible without wrapping my callback in its own a class?

share|improve this question
    
you're defining the same lambda function twice. –  Joel Cornett Mar 27 '12 at 1:12
    
@JoelCornett: Yes he is, but its his admitted non-working attempt to do a closure since he is always referring to that global i –  jdi Mar 27 '12 at 1:26
    
@jdi: ah, I see. Yeah, I would go +1 for your answer with partial. –  Joel Cornett Mar 27 '12 at 1:34

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Closures in python using functools.partial

from functools import partial

i = 0
f0 = partial(callback, i)
i = 1
f1 = partial(callback, i)

f0()
# 0
f1()
# 1

partial is like a lambda but wraps the value at that moment into the arg. Not evaluating it when its called.

Wrapping only some of the args

Yes partial will allow you to wrap any number of the arguments, and the remaining args and kwargs can then be passed to the resulting partial object so that it acts like it was calling the original wrapped function...

def callback(val1, val2):
   print "{0} {1}".format(val1, val2)

i = 0
x = 8
f0 = partial(callback, i)
f0(x)
# 0 8

Essentially you have wrapped callback(val1, val2) into callback(val2) with val1 being included as a closure already.

Example of similar effect using lambda

In case you really want to see how to do this with a lambda closure, you can see why it gets ugly and partial is preferred...

f0 = (lambda val1: lambda val2: callback(val1, val2))(i)

You have to wrap the scope variable into an outer function scope, and then reference that scope in the inner lambda function. Yuk.

Tracebacks from exceptions: partial vs lambda vs nested functions

With the influx of other answers, I thought I would outline one more reason to use partial as opposed to lambda, or a inner/outer function closure. Keep in mind I mean a function closure. functools.partial fixes the traceback you will get when your wrapped function raises an exception...

Consider this version that will raise a division by zero:

def callback(val1, val2):
    return val1 / val2

Normal outter/inner closure

def wrapper(fn, val1):
    def wrapped(val2):
            return fn(val1, val2)
    return wrapped

f0 = wrapper(callback, i)
f0(0)

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 3, in wrapped
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in callback
ZeroDivisionError: integer division or modulo by zero

lambda closure

f0 = (lambda val1: lambda val2: callback(val1, val2))(i)
f0(0)

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <lambda>
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in callback
ZeroDivisionError: integer division or modulo by zero

And now for functools.partial

f0 = partial(callback, i)
f0(0)

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in callback
ZeroDivisionError: integer division or modulo by zero
share|improve this answer
    
Is it possible for partial to produce a function that accepts arguments? (see edit) –  ajwood Mar 27 '12 at 1:10
    
@ajwood: Sure can. See my update. –  jdi Mar 27 '12 at 1:21

You can achieve this by functools.partial:

f0 = partial(callback, i)
share|improve this answer

You can make a function that creates a function. partial is another option, as mentioned by others.

def repeater(s):
  def anon():
      print s
  return anon

greet = repeater("Hello, World")
greet()
share|improve this answer

While using functools.partial is the better solution in this case, you could also create explicit closures:

def callback_generator(val):
    def callback():
        return val
    return callback
i = 0
f0 = callback1(i)
i = 1
f1 = callback1(i)

This can also be done with lambdas, as shown in the comments below.

share|improve this answer
    
lambda IS the python anonymous function. And you can do multiple anonymous functions: f = lambda x: (lambda y: y+1)(x+1). The way to do a closure with python and lambda would be: f = (lambda x: lambda: x)(i) –  jdi Mar 27 '12 at 1:37
    
See my answer for an update explaining how to do it completely with anonymous lambda functions. –  jdi Mar 27 '12 at 1:46
    
Huh, I've never thought of nesting lambdas. Why the downvote though? Would you have gone into more detail if I hadn't brought up closures? Certainly that does make this answer useful. –  forivall Mar 27 '12 at 6:35
    
It was because you had false information in your answer. But you fixed it. So its all good now. –  jdi Mar 27 '12 at 14:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.