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I have the following query:

SELECT * FROM teams
LEFT JOIN participants
ON teams.teamNo = participants.teamNo
ORDER BY teams.teamNo ASC

The query obviously gets all the teams in the team table and where there is a matching participant in the participant table that comes back. Not every team may have assigned participants but every team must be displayed.

I want to diplay the data on the same page like so (notice team 2 has no current participants but is still displayed:

Team 1:    
 - Participant 1
 - Participant 2
 - Participant 3

Team 2:

Team 3:    
 - Participant 1
 - Participant 2

I have the following array coming back from the SQL query currently:

Array
(
[0] => Array
    (
        [TeamNo] => 1
        [ParticipantFirstNames] => Katie
        [ParticipantSurname] => Bloggs
    )

[1] => Array
    (
        [TeamNo] => 1
        [ParticipantFirstNames] => Jenny
        [ParticipantSurname] => Ruffles
    )

[2] => Array
    (
        [TeamNo] => 1
        [ParticipantFirstNames] => Hannah
        [ParticipantSurname] => Cox
    )

[3] => Array
    (
        [TeamNo] => 2
        [ParticipantFirstNames] => 
        [ParticipantSurname] => 
    )

[4] => Array
    (
        [TeamNo] => 3
        [ParticipantFirstNames] => Alex
        [ParticipantSurname] => Glover
    )

[5] => Array
    (
        [TeamNo] => 3
        [ParticipantFirstNames] => Karl
        [ParticipantSurname] => Lawrence
    )

I believe I need to convert it to an array a bit like the following, but im not sure how to do this in PHP:

array(
array(  'TeamNo' => '1',
        'TeamParticipants' => array(
                            array(  'ParticipantFirstName' => 'Harry',
                                    'ParticipantSurname' => 'Bloggs'),
                            array(  'ParticipantFirstName' => 'James',
                                    'ParticipantSurname' => 'Car'))
                            )

array(  'TeamNo' => '2',
        'TeamParticipants' => array() )


array(  'TeamNo' => '3',
        'TeamParticipants' => array(
                            array(  'ParticipantFirstName' => 'Harry',
                                    'ParticipantSurname' => 'Bloggs'),
                            array(  'ParticipantFirstName' => 'James',
                                    'ParticipantSurname' => 'Car')
                                )

                            )
)

I just cant get my head around arrays can someone help, or do I need a different query in the first place?? Im using PHP.

share|improve this question
    
SQL looks good, wish I could help on the PHP; but I don't know it. –  xQbert Mar 27 '12 at 1:07

3 Answers 3

This will convert your current array into the one you want:

$newArray = array();
foreach ($resultArray as $record) {
    $currentTeam = $record('TeamNo');
    if (!array_key_exists($currentTeam, $newArray)) {
        $newArray[$currentTeam] = array('TeamNo' => $currentTeam, 'TeamParticipants => array());
    }
    if (!empty($record['ParticipantFirstName']) {
        $newArray[$currentTeam]['TeamParticipants'][] = array('ParticipantFirstName' => $record['ParticipantFirstName'], 'ParticipantLastName' => $record['ParticipantLastName']);
    }
}

This is largely untested, but it should provide basically what you want. The only difference is that I use an associative array on the outside to easily look up which team numbers have already been created.

I'm not making any judgment call on why you want the array transformed this way. I'm assuming you know best why you want the array in this format. This should help you get it there.

share|improve this answer
    
This one is perfect, thanks –  user1294320 Mar 28 '12 at 0:48
    
Glad it helped! Can you upvote it and mark it as answered? –  davidethell Mar 28 '12 at 1:20

Did you try mysql_fetch_assoc() or mysql_fetch_array()? what function are you using in fetching the outputs

 $query = "SELECT * FROM teams
 LEFT JOIN participants
 ON teams.teamNo = participants.teamNo
 ORDER BY teams.teamNo ASC"

 $result = mysql_query($query);

 while($row = mysql_fetch_array($result)){
     echo $row[0];
     echo $row[1];
     //and so on, this will display the data starting by the index 0 which is the first field
 }
share|improve this answer

Something like this should do:

$q=mysql_query("your query");
while($r=mysql_fetch_assoc($q)) {
  $a["Team ".$r["teamNo"]][]=array("fname"=>$r["firstName"], "sname"=>$r["surname"]);
}

$a["Team ".$r["teamNo"]] creates - or references the existing - value at associative index "Team N" of array $a.

$a["Team ".$r["teamNo"]][] says that the said value is an auto-incremented int-indexed array (therefore creating a new int key on each call).

We set the value matching this auto-incremented index to an array with 2 key/value pairs: "fname" referencing the current participant's first name, and "sname" referencing his/her surname. This gives the structure:

$a : array {
  "Team 1" : array {
    0 : array {
      "fname" > "Billy"
      "sname" > "The Kid"
    }
  }
  "Team 1" : array {
    1 : array {
      "fname" > "John"
      "sname" > "Dillinger"
    }
  }
  "Team 2" : array {
    0 : array {
      "fname" > "Melvin"
      "sname" > "Purvis"
    }
  }

  "Team 2" : array {
    1 : array {
      "fname" > "Eliot"
      "sname" > "Ness"
    }
  }
}

Using PHP, you access it like:

$a["Team 1"][0]["fname"] //Billy
$a["Team 1"][1]["fname"] //John
$a["Team 1"][0]["sname"] //The Kid
$a["Team 2"][1]["sname"] //Ness

So with a loop for display purposes for instance:

foreach($a as $team=>$participants) {
  echo "<h1>$team</h1>";
  foreach($participants as $identity) { //no need for keys here, as they're semantically irrelevant
    echo $identity["fname"]." ".strtoupper($identity["sname"])."<br>";
  }
}

This will display

<h1>Team 1</h1>
Billy THE KID<br>
John DILLINGER<br>
<h1>Team 2</h1>
Melvin PURVIS<br>
Eliot NESS<br>

Hope this is clear enough for you to better understand arrays.

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