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I have a list of a object "Code":

List<Code> listCodes = new List<Code>();

I need to execute each code inside the list in a Thread, but I have not idea how to do that, because I tried to do something like:

foreach(Code c in listCodes)
{
   Thread tr = new Thread(delegate() {
      Execute(c.CodeLine);
   });
}

This foreach is in a timer, because those Codes will be executed all the time, but when I do that the same code is executed a lot of times even if the first execution wasn't finished, if the code takes like 5 seconds to be executed and finished and the timer is 500ms it will be executed 10 times if I disable the timer after 5 seconds for exemple.

I couldn't think anything to execute the codes in the list, each one in their thread, but I want to execute the thread of the code 0(for exemple) only if it was finished after the execution.

Thank you.

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1  
That timer is pretty ugly. As presented there's no reason for it, you might as well loop inside the thread and use a ManualResetEvent to stop the loop. –  Hans Passant Mar 27 '12 at 2:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

System.Threading.Monitor.TryEnter is perfect for the job:

foreach(Code c in listCodes) {
   Code a = c;

   new Thread(delegate() {
       if(Monitor.TryEnter(a)) {
           Execute(a.CodeLine);
           Monitor.Exit(a);
       }
   }) { IsBackground = true }.Start();
}

What it does is try to acquire an exclusive lock on the Code object. If it can't (i.e. the Code is already executing) then nothing will happen; otherwise, the lock is acquired, and released when execution is complete.

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Won't you release the exclusive lock the moment the thread starts executing? Control is returned to the caller immediately after Execute(). –  Eric J. Mar 27 '12 at 1:18
    
@EricJ.: No, the locking code is inside the thread, not the loop. –  minitech Mar 27 '12 at 1:19
    
LOL missed that. So used to TPL now that I read past the explicit thread creation. –  Eric J. Mar 27 '12 at 1:22
    
Why are you releasing the lock even if you didn't take it? That doesn't seem like a good idea. –  svick Mar 27 '12 at 1:27
1  
@svick: Nice... catch ;) Fixed now. –  minitech Mar 27 '12 at 1:31

I think using Threads like this is inefficient, you should use Tasks instead.

In C# 5, I would do it like this:

private static async Task RunCode(Code code, TimeSpan delay)
{
    while (!Stopped)
    {
        var delayTask = Task.Delay(delay);

        Execute(code.CodeLine);

        await delayTask;
    }
}

And then start it once (i.e. not in a timer):

foreach (Code c in listCodes)
{
    Task.Run(() => RunCode(c, TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(1000)));
}
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You need to actually wait for the Threads to finish. You do this by calling Join:

List<Thread> threads = new List<Threads>();

foreach(Code c in listCodes)
{
   Thread tr = new Thread(delegate() {
      Execute(c.CodeLine);
   });
   threads.Add(tr);
}

foreach(Thread tr in threads)
{
   tr.Join();
}

This is all inside your outer timer.

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1  
That will block the main thread until all other threads complete, which would require the Code threads to be Execute'd on a thread that can block. –  Eric J. Mar 27 '12 at 1:21

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