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I have a structure like:

<div id="holder">
    <div id="first"></div>
    <div class="box">I'm the first</div>
    <div class="box">Nothing special</div>
    <div class="box">Nothing special</div>
    <div class="box">Nothing special</div>
    <div class="box">Nothing special</div>
    <div class="box">Nothing special</div>
    <div class="box">Make this background orange!!!</div>
    <div id="last"></div>
</div>​

I need the last .box element to have an orange background.

.box:last-child{} won't work because it isn't the last child. Apart from wrapping only the .box's in an element, is there any way to do this? This problem does represent what I'm trying to do, but I'd also like to know if there is a way to match the last matched element of a selector.

http://jsfiddle.net/walkerneo/KUa8B/1/

Extra notes:

  • No javascript
  • No giving the last element an extra class
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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Sorry, aside from abusing sibling combinators or :nth-last-child() in a way that depends fully on your HTML structure1, it's currently not possible with CSS selectors alone.

This very feature looks slated to be added to Selectors 4 as :nth-last-match(), though, which in your case would be used like this:

:nth-last-match(1 of .box) {
    background: orange;
}

But I don't know if the syntax is going to change or when vendors will start implementing it, so let's just leave that as a hypothetical-theoretical-maybe kind of thing for now.


1 Something like this, given that your last .box is also the second last child:

.box:nth-last-child(2) {
    background: orange;
}
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Even then it can't be used for another decade (courtesy of IE). Well, now I know. Thanks! –  mowwwalker Mar 27 '12 at 1:20
3  
@Walkerneo: I have faith that Microsoft will give it a try in IE12. –  BoltClock Mar 27 '12 at 1:21
    
Do CSS and ECMAscript versions refer to the specs? –  mowwwalker Mar 27 '12 at 1:32
1  
What do you mean? –  BoltClock Mar 27 '12 at 1:33
    
I mean CSS and javacript are based on browser implementations right? If so, then you can't really update either, you can only update the spec for the browsers to update right? –  mowwwalker Mar 27 '12 at 1:37

You could use this css selector if you know that your box class that you want with the orange background is always the second last.

.box:nth-last-of-type(2){
 background:orange;   
}
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You can give nth-last-of-type() for a workaround

#holder > .box:nth-last-of-type(2) {
    background:orange;
}

Demo

However, here is also another way of getting this done

<div id="holder">
    <div id="first"></div>
    <div class="boxes">
        <div class="box">I'm the first</div>
        <div class="box">Nothing special</div>
        <div class="box">Nothing special</div>
        <div class="box">Nothing special</div>
        <div class="box">Nothing special</div>
        <div class="box">Nothing special</div>
        <div class="box">Make this background orange!!!</div>
    </div>
    <div id="last"></div>
</div>

Then, you can use

.boxes .box:last-child {
    background:orange;
}

Demo

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How is :last-child more cross-browser compatible with :nth-last-of-type(2)? What if the #first and #last elements are required? –  BoltClock Mar 27 '12 at 1:51
    
@BoltClock, I was mistaken, I thought IE 7 took on last-child –  Starx Mar 27 '12 at 1:53
    
@BoltClock, And #first and #last are still there –  Starx Mar 27 '12 at 1:53
    
I see it now, it was missing from your answer. –  BoltClock Mar 27 '12 at 1:55
    
@BoltClock, I just kept it in the demo :) –  Starx Mar 27 '12 at 1:56
div:nth-last-child(2){
    background-color: orange; 
}
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