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I have the following for loop, and when I use splice() to remove an item, I then get that 'seconds' is undefined. I could check if it's undefined, but I feel there's probably a more elegant way to do this. The desire is to simply delete an item and keep on going.

 for (i = 0, len = Auction.auctions.length; i < len; i++) {
            auction = Auction.auctions[i];
            Auction.auctions[i]['seconds'] --;
            if (auction.seconds < 0) { 
                Auction.auctions.splice(i, 1);
            }

        }

Thanks!

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2  
In addition to iterating backwards and adjust length, you can also just put the members you want into a new array. –  RobG Mar 27 '12 at 2:09
    
For the public good, you should change the accepted answer to the community answer below (iterate in reverse) since it's a more elegant, simple, and performant solution. :) –  Eric Goldberg Nov 28 '12 at 22:10
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4 Answers 4

up vote 154 down vote accepted

The array is being re-indexed when you do a .splice(), which means you'll skip over an index when one is removed, and your cached .length is obsolete.

To fix it, you'd either need to decrement i after a .splice(), or simply iterate in reverse...

var len = Auction.auctions.length
while (len--) {
    ....
}

This way the re-indexing doesn't affect the next item in the iteration, since the indexing affects only the items from the current point to the end of the Array, and the next item in the iteration is lower than the current point.

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Looks like the best solution to me. And the fastest one, by the way. –  Dmitry Pashkevich Oct 25 '12 at 13:08
    
Nice! Why is this a community wiki btw? –  0xc0de Sep 6 '13 at 7:10
    
Out of interest, this solution in its current guise presumably wont work if the array was an array of functions that you wanted to iterate over and invoke in the order that they were added to the array, for example? –  SCRIPTONITE Sep 30 '13 at 13:04
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Recalculate the length each time through the loop instead of just at the outset, e.g.:

for (i = 0; i < Auction.auctions.length; i++) {
      auction = Auction.auctions[i];
      Auction.auctions[i]['seconds'] --;
      if (auction.seconds < 0) { 
          Auction.auctions.splice(i, 1);
          i--; //decrement
      }
}

That way you won't exceed the bounds.

EDIT: added a decrement in the if statement.

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2  
I thnk it's easier to just go backwards through the array, then you don't need to adjust the length at all. –  RobG Mar 27 '12 at 2:08
2  
I also overlooked recalculating the array length after splicing in a loop. Funny how something so simple can have us scratching our heads for a moment. –  Doug S Oct 27 '12 at 5:40
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Although your question is about deleting elements from the array being iterated upon and not about removing elements (in addition to some other processing) efficiently, I think one should reconsider it if in similar situation.

The algorithmic complexity of this approach is O(n^2) as splice function and the for loop both iterate over the array (splice function shifts all elements of array in the worst case). Instead you can just push the required elements to the new array and then just assign that array to the desired variable (which was just iterated upon).

var newArray = [];
for (var i = 0, len = Auction.auctions.length; i < len; i++) {
    auction = Auction.auctions[i];
    auction.seconds--;
    if (!auction.seconds < 0) { 
        newArray.push(auction);
    }
}
Auction.auctions = newArray;

Also you can use the array functions introduced in ECMAScript 5 (Not sure about the version :( ).

Auction.auctions = Auction.auctions.filter(function(auction) {
    return --auction.seconds >=0;
});
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I thinks your method is the safest, as it creates a new array we do not have to worry about the for() index to "break". With newer browsers, though we can use the Array.filter() function instead: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… –  Alexis Wilke May 24 at 4:55
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Auction.auction = Auction.auctions.filter(function(el) {
  return --el["seconds"] > 0;
});
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This is a cool method, similar to 0xc0de above. Only problem, it was implemented in IE9+ only... so not backward compatible. –  Alexis Wilke May 24 at 4:17
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