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I am a beginner and writing code to display data in a Gridview using Asp.Net and c#. I want to know if the approach I followed is correct or not. I want suggestions on standards and architectural issues, best practices with my code so that I can modify my code accordingly. I appreciate your great suggestions and code additions.

Connection Code:

    public class DemoProjConnectionClass
    {
        public SqlConnection DemoProjConnection()
        {
            SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection("Data Source=Localhost;Initial Catalog=master;Integrated Security=True");
            return con;
        }
    }

Domain Code(gets & sets):

public class DemoProjDomainClass
{

public int EmpId { get; set; } 
public string EmpName { get; set; } 
public int Salary { get; set; } 

 } 

Class Library Code:

public class DemoProjServiceClass
{
    public IList<DemoProjDomainClass> getDemoProjList()
    {
        string sqlDemoProjList;
        sqlDemoProjList = "SELECT EmpId,EmpName,Salary from Employee";
        DemoProjConnectionClass x = new DemoProjConnectionClass();
        SqlConnection con = x.DemoProjConnection();
        con.Open();
        SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand(sqlDemoProjList, con);
        cmd.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
        SqlDataAdapter da = new SqlDataAdapter(cmd);
        DataSet ds = new DataSet();
        da.Fill(ds, "tempTable1");



        IList<DemoProjDomainClass> DemoProjList = new List<DemoProjDomainClass>();
        for (int i = 0; i < ds.Tables[0].Rows.Count; i++)
        {
            DemoProjDomainClass _obj = new DemoProjDomainClass();

            _obj.EmpId = Convert.ToInt16(ds.Tables[0].Rows[i][0]);_obj.EmpName = ds.Tables[0].Rows[i][1].ToString();_obj.Salary = Convert.ToInt16(ds.Tables[0].Rows[i][2]);DemoProjList.Add(_obj);
        }
        return DemoProjList;
    }
} 

UI Code

protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
   DemoProjServiceClass ob=new DemoProjServiceClass();
    GridView1.DataSource = ob.getDemoProjList();
    GridView1.DataBind();

}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Connection Code:

I will not hardcode the connectionstring like that. I will keep that in a config file (web.config or so..) and read from there so that i can change my connection string any time if needed with a recompilation.

Class Library Code

Your getDemoProjList method dont have any exception handling. I will wrap that code with using statement so that i dont need to worry abour closing my connection

UI

I dont think you should load data in the PageLoad without checking whether it is a postback or not. So will use a isPostBAck property checkk. I would also do a null check before binding it as the data source of the grid.

protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  if (!IsPostBack)
  {
    DemoProjServiceClass ob=new DemoProjServiceClass();
    List<DemoProjDomainClass> objList=ob.getDemoProjList();
    if(objList!=null)
    {
       GridView1.DataSource = objList;
       GridView1.DataBind();
    }
   }

}
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1  
pls tell why down vote for ? –  Shyju Mar 27 '12 at 3:43
    
Excellent comments. I noted them down. Thanks a ton. –  Chandana Mar 27 '12 at 4:48
    
in class library code, Is data set a best option to use and then looping it to list? –  Chandana Mar 27 '12 at 4:51
1  
@Usham : Use data readers wherever possible instead of data set. –  Shyju Mar 27 '12 at 11:39

I suggest you to :

  1. Use MVC instead asp.net classic
  2. Use linq or EntityFramework instead (cmd,conn,adapter,dataset)
  3. Use repeater instead grid for more performance

Take a look at this tutorial on asp.net site

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Not really. What you need from this standpoint is data access layer. http://martinfowler.com/eaaCatalog/ Use Data Source Architectural Patterns item. Regarding your code connection most of time should not be hardcoded but defined in some kind of configuration file. Let's assume Domain is fine, but most of time you need to implement Domain pattern which is described more in catalog as well if you have some additional logic of your domain models. Avoid hardcoding of your sql queries due to possible SQL injection, use Disposable pattern ("using" keyword in terms of C# development) where appropriate. For major cases ORMs work pretty fine to accomplish basic functionality and even more, so there are only one two good reasons to use SqlCommand: when you gain maximum performance or when you learn the basics. There cons as well. You maintainability decreases and amount of code increases. From my prospective ASP.Net MVC provides you with highly maintainable and configurable level of code. That's why you can really pay some attention to it. But it's up to you if to do so or not.

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For your Connection Code move everything inside of the SqlConnection brackets into your webconfig like this:

<connectionStrings> <add name="abcConnectionString" connectionString="Data Source=Localhost;Initial Catalog=master;Integrated Security=True providerName="System.Data.SqlClient" /> </connectionStrings> and then reference it in your code like this:

using System.Configuration;

string connStr = ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["abcConnectionString"].ConnectionString;
        SqlConnection Con = new SqlConnection(connStr);
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Use Enterprise library to handle your data access code.

share|improve this answer
    
Enterprise library is too old –  pylover Mar 27 '12 at 4:47

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