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I have this Structure the elements of which that I need to write in a text file

struct Stage3ADisplay
{
    int nSlot;
    char *Item;
    char *Type;
    int nIndex;
    unsigned char attributesMD[17]; //the last character is \0
    unsigned char contentsMD[17]; //only for regular files - //the last character is \0
};  

buffer = malloc(sizeof(Stage3ADisplayVar[nIterator]->nSlot) + sizeof(Stage3ADisplayVar[nIterator]->Item) + sizeof(Stage3ADisplayVar[nIterator]->Type) + sizeof(Stage3ADisplayVar[nIterator]->nIndex) + sizeof(Stage3ADisplayVar[nIterator]->attributesMD) + sizeof(Stage3ADisplayVar[nIterator]->contentsMD) + 1);

sprintf (buffer,"%d %s %s %d %x %x",Stage3ADisplayVar[nIterator]->nSlot, Stage3ADisplayVar[nIterator]->Item,Stage3ADisplayVar[nIterator]->Type,Stage3ADisplayVar[nIterator]->nIndex,Stage3ADisplayVar[nIterator]->attributesMD,Stage3ADisplayVar[nIterator]->contentsMD);

How do I make sure the rows in the file are properly aligned. Thank you.

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3  
What do you mean "properly aligned"? –  Carl Norum Mar 27 '12 at 4:51
4  
The way you calculate the buffer size is deeply flawed. sizeof won't tell you the size of the fields when converted to character strings. –  Blastfurnace Mar 27 '12 at 4:56
    
Could you please elaborate? I was using the sizeof function on the actual elements of the populated structure and not the structure definition itself. Would it still be flawed that way? –  user1067334 Mar 27 '12 at 16:42
    
It's still flawed. The result of sizeof(int) is the size of an integer variable, not how many characters it would take to display the stored value. An int that contains the value 1 is the same size when it contains 1000000 but the printed output length is different. Similarly, sizeof(char*) is the size of the pointer, not the length of the null-terminated string it points to. –  Blastfurnace Mar 27 '12 at 17:00
    
Ah, I see. So, what should I need to do to find the actual printed output length? –  user1067334 Mar 27 '12 at 18:45
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If your question relates to sprintf ,

Change

 sprintf (buffer,"%d %s %s %d %x %x"

to

 sprintf (buffer,"%22.22d %22.22s %22.22s %22.22d %22.22x %22.22x"

to see how %nn.nn works.

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I tried using the nn.nn method but however I get a segmentation fault. I believe this is because when I do %22.22s on the string, the string length is lesser than 22 in some situations. The thing is I cannot determine the length of the string at run-time but I am fairly sure it is always under 10 characters or fewer. Is there a way to make it more dynamic but have it properly aligned? –  user1067334 Mar 27 '12 at 5:44
    
strlen() returns the length of a string. –  Java42 Mar 27 '12 at 5:53
    
Also, using "%[flags][width][.precision][length]" specifier is not causing the seg fault. You have multiple problems. Test with string constants until you get sprinf working to format your data. Read cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdio/printf –  Java42 Mar 27 '12 at 5:59
    
Also, use "char * buffer = (char *)malloc(2222);" as the sprintf buffer until you get sprintf() and strlen() under your belt. –  Java42 Mar 27 '12 at 6:04
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Thank you. I found the answer I was looking for. Since I knew the expected maximum value a string can take from the test data,even though I used char pointer, I left aligned the fields by a specified limit.

buffer = malloc(sizeof(Stage3ADisplayVar[nIterator]->nSlot) + sizeof(Stage3ADisplayVar[nIterator]->Item) + sizeof(Stage3ADisplayVar[nIterator]->Type) + sizeof(Stage3ADisplayVar[nIterator]->nIndex) + sizeof(Stage3ADisplayVar[nIterator]->attributesMD) + sizeof(Stage3ADisplayVar[nIterator]->contentsMD) + 1 + 53);

sprintf (buffer,"%-3d %-10s %-10s %-10d %-10x %-10x",Stage3ADisplayVar[nIterator]->nSlot, Stage3ADisplayVar[nIterator]->Item,Stage3ADisplayVar[nIterator]->Type,Stage3ADisplayVar[nIterator]->nIndex,Stage3ADisplayVar[nIterator]->attributesMD,Stage3ADisplayVar[nIterator]->contentsMD);
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Instead of adding a fudge factor of 53 to your flawed buffer length calculation you could just decide on a reasonable maximum value and say buffer = malloc(120);. Note, I made up the value 120 for this example. –  Blastfurnace Mar 27 '12 at 17:11
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