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So I have this code:

Team1 = ["Red", 10]
Team2 = ["Green", 5]
Team3 = ["Blue", 6]
Team4 = ["Yellow", 8]
Team5 = ["Purple", 9]
Team6 = ["Brown", 4]

TeamList = [Team1, Team2, Team3, Team4, Team5, Team6]

I want to make a two-dimensional list of difference in scores between each pair of teams. The output can be like this: Output

What is the easiest way to do this? Thanks :)

share|improve this question
    
two for loops... – K Mehta Mar 27 '12 at 5:57
    
do you know about dict ? – wim Mar 27 '12 at 6:00
5  
This would be a good homework assignment – John La Rooy Mar 27 '12 at 6:00
    
Shouldn't all differences be positive? abs(team1-team2) ? – Josh Smeaton Mar 27 '12 at 6:09
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Just using tabs rather than any fancy formatting to build the chart:

Team1 = ["Red", 10]
Team2 = ["Green", 5]
Team3 = ["Blue", 6]
Team4 = ["Yellow", 8]
Team5 = ["Purple", 9]
Team6 = ["Brown", 4]

TeamList = [Team1, Team2, Team3, Team4, Team5, Team6]

# print the top row of team names, tab separated, starting two tabs over:
print '\t\t', '\t'.join(team[0] for team in TeamList)

# for each row in the chart
for team in TeamList:
    # put two tabs between each score difference column
    scoreline = '\t\t'.join(str(team[1] - other[1]) for other in TeamList)
    # and print the team name, a tab, then the score columns
    print team[0], '\t', scoreline
share|improve this answer
    
Alternately, string formatting using fixed-width fields for the text. (Honk if you love sprintf().) – Li-aung Yip Mar 27 '12 at 7:37

You could try:

[[x[1]-y[1] for y in TeamList] for x in TeamList]

That will generate a nested list representing the proposed output (without the column and row headings, of course).

share|improve this answer
1  
The OP seems new to Python, so I'd introduce the "simpler" version of for before this – K Mehta Mar 27 '12 at 6:05
1  
@Kshitij This way is objectively simpler. It is only because of your familiarity with other programming languages that you think otherwise. – Karl Knechtel Mar 27 '12 at 6:50
    
@KarlKnechtel but it also introduces lambda definitions with unnatural scopes. While most experienced python programmers love one-liners like this one (myself included), I believe it could confuse newcomers to the language. Of course, that's just my opinion. – K Mehta Mar 27 '12 at 7:30
    
What's unnatural about the scope here? What has this got to do with lambda? It means exactly what it says: a list of (each list of the results of x[1] - y[1] for each y value) for each x value. – Karl Knechtel Mar 27 '12 at 17:16

You could try nested for loop. Something like this:-

for team1 in TeamList:
    for team2 in TeamList:
        print team1[1]-team2[1]

This will give the score difference. The output will have to be formatted to get the exact table look that you want.

share|improve this answer

A list comprehension would work (but nested list comprehensions don't sit quite right with me.) itertools.product() is another way.

Consider the following as food for thought:

import itertools

scores = {
"Red"   : 10,
"Green" : 5,
"Blue"  : 6,
"Yellow": 8,
"Purple": 9,
"Brown" : 4,
}

for team_1, team_2 in itertools.product(scores, scores):
    print ("Team 1 [%s] scored %i, Team 2 [%s] scored %i." % (team_1, scores[team_1], team_2, scores[team_2]) )

Which outputs:

Team 1 [Blue] scored 6, Team 2 [Blue] scored 6.
Team 1 [Blue] scored 6, Team 2 [Brown] scored 4.
... (32 more lines) ...
Team 1 [Red] scored 10, Team 2 [Green] scored 5.
Team 1 [Red] scored 10, Team 2 [Red] scored 10.
share|improve this answer
Team1 = ["Red", 10]
Team2 = ["Green", 5]
Team3 = ["Blue", 6]
Team4 = ["Yellow", 8]
Team5 = ["Purple", 9]
Team6 = ["Brown", 4]

TeamList = [Team1, Team2, Team3, Team4, Team5, Team6]

# calculate scores
scores = [[x[1]-y[1] for y in TeamList] for x in TeamList]

# print the top row of team names, tab separated, starting two tabs over:
print('\t\t', '\t'.join(team[0] for team in TeamList))

# for each row in the chart
for score, team in zip(scores,TeamList):
    print(("%s"+"\t%s"*len(TeamList)) % ((team[0],)+tuple(score)))
share|improve this answer

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