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I'm trying to generate LIMIT (lets say limit = 1000) prime numbers and store them to an array, but I get junk returned. Here's my code:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
void prime_num(int);
int main()
{
    int primes[1000];
    int n, p, t, LIMIT = 1000;
    for(n=2; n <= LIMIT; n++)
    {
        t=0;
        for(p=2; p <= n/2; p++)
        {
            if (n%p == 0)
            {
                t = 1;
                break;
            }
        }
        if(!t) 
            primes[p-2] = n;
    }
    for (int i = 0; i < LIMIT; i++)
        cout << primes[i] <<" ";
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
I'd start by breaking it up into some understandable pieces. You seem to have had that in mind with the prototype for prime_num, but don't seem to have followed through. I'd also change that to something like bool isprime(int); that returns a bool to indicate whether a particular number is prime. – Jerry Coffin Mar 27 '12 at 6:07
    
I think you want to find primes less than or equal to LIMIT; not find LIMIT primes. – Apprentice Queue Mar 27 '12 at 6:10

Define a variable outside the outer loop:

int count=0;

and then use it here:

primes[count++] = n;

then print as:

for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
    cout << primes[i] <<" ";

Explanation:

You're not generating 1000 prime numbers, rather you're generating all prime numbers less than or equal to 1000.


As @Jerry Coffin commented, your code should be like this:

Note : I'm not talking about correctness, rather the skeleton of the program; so you decide if is_prime() function is correct or not, optimized or not, etc.

bool  is_prime(int n)
{
        for(int p=2; p <= n/2; p++)
        {
            if (n%p == 0)
            {
                return false;
            }
        }
        return true;
}
int main()
{
    int primes[1000];
    int n, p, t, LIMIT = 1000;
    int count=0;
    for(n=2; n <= LIMIT; n++)
    {
       if (is_prime(n) )
          primes[count++] = n;
    }
    for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
        cout << primes[i] <<" ";
    return 0;
}

Correctness and Optimization of is_prime():

Now you decide the correctness of is_prime(). Is it correctly written? Is it optimized? Do you really need to check for all integers in the range [2,n/2]?

share|improve this answer
    
And in your final loop, i < count instead of i < LIMIT. – Apprentice Queue Mar 27 '12 at 6:08
    
Thank you very much. Is there a more compact way to do what I'm trying to do? – Rndpbs Mar 27 '12 at 6:13
    
@user1293973: Think and Try Yourself. :-) – Nawaz Mar 27 '12 at 6:14

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