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In C, I would do this:

int i;
for (i = 0;; i++)
  if (thereIsAReasonToBreak(i))
    break;

How can I achieve something similar in Python?

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1  
I'm no python expert but while (true): if reasonneeded(i) break i = i+1 Should work? –  hkf Mar 27 '12 at 6:15
1  
But then that kills the whole point of using a for loop. :( –  Brandon Mar 27 '12 at 6:15
    
Not sure why you're tied into for but they are functionally identical –  hkf Mar 27 '12 at 6:16
    
possible duplicate of python unbounded xrange() –  wim Mar 27 '12 at 6:20
1  
@wim: it's pretty much a question about coding style, I think. The preference for a "for" loop is one of style, simply that it puts the i++ up at the top of the code for the loop. Python isn't designed to offer exactly the same control structures as C, though, so tying to copy C style too closely can be awkward. IIRC, Guido basically says, "for heaven's sake, just use while loops and stop being so precious" ;-) –  Steve Jessop Mar 27 '12 at 8:31

6 Answers 6

up vote 26 down vote accepted

Using count from itertools

import itertools
for i in itertools.count():
  if thereIsAReasonToBreak(i):
    break

In Python2 xrange() is limited to sys.maxint, which may be enough for most practical purposes

import sys
for i in range(sys.maxint):
  if thereIsAReasonToBreak(i):
    break

In Python3, range() can go much higher, though not to infinity

import sys
for i in range(sys.maxsize**10):  # you could go even higher if you really want
  if thereIsAReasonToBreak(i):
    break

So it's probably best to use count()

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2  
"though not to infinity" - absolute classic! :-) –  paxdiablo Mar 27 '12 at 6:31
5  
This also plays nicely with takewhile : for x in takewhile(thereIsAReasonToContinue, count()): –  georg Mar 27 '12 at 7:05

Reiterating thg435's comment:

from itertools import takewhile, count

def thereIsAReasonToContinue(i):
    return not thereIsAReasonToBreak(i)

for i in takewhile(thereIsAReasonToContinue, count()):
    pass # or something else

Or perhaps more concisely:

from itertools import takewhile, count

for i in takewhile(lambda x : not thereIsAReasonToBreak(x), count()):
    pass # or something else

takewhile imitates a "well-behaved" C for loop: you have a continuation condition, but you have a generator instead of an arbitrary expression. There are things you can do in a C for loop that are "badly behaved", such as modifying i in the loop body. It's possible to imitate those too using takewhile, if the generator is a closure over some local variable i that you then mess with. In a way, defining that closure makes it especially obvious that you're doing something potentially confusing with your control structure.

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def to_infinity():
    index=0
    while 1:
        yield index
        index += 1

for i in to_infinity():
    if i > 10:break
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a = 1
while a:
    if a == Thereisareasontobreak(a):
        break
    a += 1
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i = 0
while True:
  if there_is_reason_to_break(i):
    break
  i += 1

Alternatively:

i = 0
while not there_is_reason_to_break(i):
  i += 1
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If you're doing that in C, then your judgement there is as cloudy as it would be in Python :-)

The better C way would be:

int i = 0;
while (! thereIsAReasonToBreak (i)) {
    // do something
    i++;
}

or:

int i;  // *may* be better inside the for statement to localise scope
for (i = 0; ! thereIsAReasonToBreak (i); i++) {
    // do something
}

That would translate to the Python:

i = 0
while not thereIsAReasonToBreak (i):
    # do something
    i += 1

Only if you need to exit in the middle of the loop somewhere would you need to worry about breaking. If your potential exit is at the start of the loop (as it appears to be here), it's usually better to encode the exit into the loop itself.

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