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Could someone suggest me a tool to find circular dependencies? I tried with a graph of the project but it has hundreds of header files so is very complicated to find them.

I edit the post with the meaning of circular dependency:

  • File A.h has a #include "B.h" guard.
  • File B.h has a #include "A.h" guard.

Thanks.

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4  
Circular dependencies between what? I can thinks of various meanings. Could you please elaborate? –  FireAphis Mar 27 '12 at 8:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I have found one way to get circular dependencies:

  1. Generate a DOT file which describes a #include dependency directed graph using cinclude2dot.pl Perl script.

    ./cinclude2dot.pl --src path_to_include_dir graph.dot

  2. Decompose directed graph into strongly connected components (circular dependencies):

    sccmap -v graph.dot

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You could query for possible or actual inclusion cycles, because the preprocessing directives actually are a language, to be debugged...

To know about actual cycles, you could use preprocessor cpp with options

-M  Instead of outputting the result of preprocessing, output a rule suitable for make describing the dependencies of the main source file...

or better

-MM Like -M but do not mention header files that are found in system header directories, nor header files that are included, directly or indirectly, from such a header.

and

-MF file
       When used with -M or -MM, specifies a file to write the dependencies to.  If no -MF switch is given the preprocessor sends the rules to the same place it would have sent preprocessed output.

You will get an error on nesting deep overflow when a cycle is found, and the output specified with -MF should be useful to spot the problem.

To know about possible cycles an approximate analysis, that recursively visit source files, should be easily feasible, using a map to track included files.

edit: here is sketched a program for such approximate analysis

#include <set>
#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <fstream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <algorithm>
#include <stdexcept>

#include <boost/foreach.hpp>
#include <boost/filesystem.hpp>
#include <boost/program_options.hpp>

using namespace std;
using namespace boost;
using namespace boost::filesystem;
using namespace boost::program_options;

struct inclusions
{
    inclusions(int argc, char **argv)
    {
        options_description ops("detect_loops usage");
        ops.add_options()
             ("include,I", value< vector<string> >(), "search paths")
             ("file,F",    value< string >(),         "file to be analyzed");
        variables_map vm;
        store(parse_command_line(argc, argv, ops), vm);
        notify(vm);

        path start = locate(vm["file"].as<string>());
        simstack.push_back(start);

        // file directory is always search start
        include_paths.push_back(start.parent_path());

        if (vm.count("include"))
        {
            vector<string> s = vm["include"].as< vector<string> >();
            copy(s.begin(), s.end(), back_inserter(include_paths));
        }

        scan_includes();
    }

    typedef vector<path> t_paths;
    t_paths include_paths;

    t_paths simstack;

    typedef vector<t_paths> t_cycles;
    t_cycles cycles;

    set<path> analyzed;

    path locate(string file)
    {
        path p(file);
        if (exists(p))
            return p;
        BOOST_FOREACH(path i, include_paths)
        {
            path q = i / p;
            if (exists(q))
                return q;
        }
        throw domain_error(file + " not fund");
    }

    void scan_includes()
    {
        path c = simstack.back();
        if (analyzed.find(c) != analyzed.end())
            return;

        ifstream f(c.string());
        string l;
        while (getline(f, l))
        {
            char included[256 + 1];
            if (sscanf(l.c_str(), " # include \"%256[^\"]\"", included) == 1)
            {
                path p = locate(included);

                // check loops before recurse
                t_paths::iterator g = find(simstack.begin(), simstack.end(), p);
                if (g != simstack.end())
                {
                    t_paths loop(g, simstack.end());
                    loop.push_back(p);
                    cycles.push_back(loop);
                }
                else
                {
                    simstack.push_back(p);
                    scan_includes();
                    simstack.pop_back();
                }
            }
        }

        analyzed.insert(c);
    }
};

int main_detect_loops(int argc, char **argv)
{
    try
    {
        inclusions i(argc, argv);
        BOOST_FOREACH(inclusions::t_paths p, i.cycles)
        {
            copy(p.begin(), p.end(), ostream_iterator<path>(cout, ","));
            cout << endl;
        }
        return 0;
    }
    catch(const std::exception &e)
    {
        cerr << e.what() << endl;
        return 1;
    }
}
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The '-MM' method only works if the header files have no inclusion guards, so it never works in practice –  anatolyg Mar 27 '12 at 12:10

According to your problem you are workng with number of header files. One solution to this is, if you remove the method definitions from the header files and let the classes contain only the method declarations and variable declarations/definitions. The method definitions should be placed in a .cpp file (just like a best practice guideline says).

//A.h 
#ifndef A_H 
#define A_H 
class B; 
class A 
{ 
        int _val; 
        B* _b; 
public: 

        A(int val); 
        void SetB(B *b); 
        void Print(); 
}; 
#endif 

//B.h 
#ifndef B_H 
#define B_H 
class A; 
class B 
{ 
        double _val; 
        A* _a; 
public: 

        B(double val); 
        void SetA(A *a); 
        void Print(); 
}; 
#endif 

//A.cpp 
#include "A.h" 
#include "B.h" 

#include <iostream> 

using namespace std; 

A::A(int val) 
:_val(val) 
{ 
} 

void A::SetB(B *b) 
{ 
        _b = b; 
        cout<<"Inside SetB()"<<endl; 
        _b->Print(); 
} 

void A::Print() 
{ 
        cout<<"Type:A val="<<_val<<endl; 
} 

//B.cpp 
#include "B.h" 
#include "A.h" 
#include <iostream> 

using namespace std; 

B::B(double val) 
:_val(val) 
{ 
} 

void B::SetA(A *a) 
{ 
        _a = a; 
        cout<<"Inside SetA()"<<endl; 
        _a->Print(); 
} 

void B::Print() 
{ 
        cout<<"Type:B val="<<_val<<endl; 
} 

//main.cpp 
#include "A.h" 
#include "B.h" 

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) 
{ 
        A a(10); 
        B b(3.14); 
        a.Print(); 
        a.SetB(&b); 
        b.Print(); 
        b.SetA(&a); 
        return 0; 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer but I can't modify the code. I just need to know which files have a circular dependency. –  Emilio Mar 27 '12 at 9:46
    
A.h includes B.h and B.h includes A.h . In c++ this isnt really allowed as they tend to include each other over and over again causing endless loop. –  IndieProgrammer Mar 27 '12 at 10:10

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