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I am using hibernate and id... is used for persistence (which is why it is omitted in comparison). (Also, using google guava helper equals)

HolidayPackageVariant:

public abstract class HolidayPackageVariant {
    private Integer idHolidayPackageVariant;
    private HolidayPackage holidayPackage;
    private String typeHolidayPackage;

@Override
public boolean equals(Object obj) {
    if (obj == this)
        return true;
    if(obj == null)
        return false;

    if (getClass().equals(obj.getClass())) {
        final HolidayPackageVariant otherPackageVariant = (HolidayPackageVariant) obj;
        return Objects.equal(getTypeHolidayPackage(),otherPackageVariant.getTypeHolidayPackage())
                && Objects.equal(getHolidayPackage(),
                        otherPackageVariant.getHolidayPackage());
    }
    return false;
}

@Override
public int hashCode() {
    return Objects.hashCode(getTypeHolidayPackage(), getHolidayPackage());
}

FlightHolidayPackageVariant:

public final class FlightHolidayPackageVariant extends HolidayPackageVariant{
    private Destination originCity;
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
    // .. 

Should I completely override the equals() or should I be invoking super.equals(...) in some way ?

share|improve this question
2  
getClass().equals(obj.getClass()) -> NPE if obj is null. –  aviad Mar 27 '12 at 8:32
5  
Secret of equals; Effective Java –  McDowell Mar 27 '12 at 8:47
    
@aviad updated the answer for null check. –  brainydexter Mar 27 '12 at 9:20
    
I wonder why don't you use helper classes EqualsBuilder and HashCodeBuilder from the Apache Commons Lang library? –  aviad Mar 27 '12 at 9:52
1  
just found this question that does great comparison between Guava and Apache Commons: stackoverflow.com/questions/4542550/… –  aviad Mar 27 '12 at 10:13

2 Answers 2

Following the Secret of Equals:

HolidayPackageVariant:

public abstract class HolidayPackageVariant {
    private Integer idHolidayPackageVariant;
    private HolidayPackage holidayPackage;
    private String typeHolidayPackage;

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        if (obj == this) return true;
        if(obj == null) return false;

        if (getClass().equals(obj.getClass())) {
            final HolidayPackageVariant otherPackageVariant = (HolidayPackageVariant) obj;
            return Objects.equal(getTypeHolidayPackage(),otherPackageVariant.getTypeHolidayPackage())
                    && Objects.equal(getHolidayPackage(),
                            otherPackageVariant.getHolidayPackage());
        }
        return false;
    }
}

FlightHolidayPackageVariant:

public final class FlightHolidayPackageVariant extends HolidayPackageVariant{
    private Destination originCity;

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {

        if(super.equals(obj)){
            return Objects.equal(getOriginCity(),
                    ((FlightHolidayPackageVariant)(obj)).getOriginCity());
        }
        return false;
    }
}

This will ensure that only the same Type of variants are equal to each other.

share|improve this answer
    
In FlightHolidayPackageVariant, the two lines if(obj==this) return true; if(obj==null) return false; are completely unnecessary as these tests are the first tests performed in the super.equals(obj). –  Olivier Grégoire Mar 27 '12 at 12:39
    
@ogregoire: True! :( My brain is just not thinking straight –  brainydexter Mar 27 '12 at 12:45
    
This link seems to completely ignore the problem of substitutability, which is important. The author even quotes Effective Java and so it seems like she discovered something EJ didn't already, but EJ already considers her solution and refutes it. –  Kevin Bourrillion Mar 27 '12 at 14:44
    
@KevinBourrillion Can you talk a little bit about substitutability that you mentioned ? Also, please suggest me edits in this solution I came up with. –  brainydexter Mar 27 '12 at 19:22
    
You can read about the Liskov substitution principle on Wikipedia. –  Olivier Grégoire Mar 28 '12 at 8:35

This is how you should implement data objects: no inheritance allowed, composition only.

These are immutable objects, but you could want to modify them, so remove final where needed. Also you may remove final from the class definition because Hibernate doesn't support it, but in that case, you should document that these classes are not eligible for inheritance.

The main advantages are all the ones described in Effective Java plus, in this case, you don't have to manage inheritance through Hibernate which can sometimes be a real pain.

public final class HolidayPackageVariant {
  private final Integer idHolidayPackageVariant;
  private final HolidayPackage holidayPackage;
  private final String typeHolidayPackage;

  ...

  @Override
  public boolean equals(Object obj) {
    if (obj == this)
      return true;
    if (!(obj instanceof HolidayPackageVariant))
      return false;

    HolidayPackageVariant that = (HolidayPackageVariant) obj;
    return Objects.equal(this.typeHolidayPackage, that.typeHolidayPackage)
        && Objects.equal(this.holidayPackage, that.holidayPackage);
  }

  @Override
  public int hashCode() {
    return Objects.hashCode(this.typeHolidayPackage, this.holidayPackage);
  }
}

public final class FlightHolidayPackageVariant {
  private HolidayPackageVariant holidayPackageVariant;
  private Destination originCity;

  ...

  public HolidayPackageVariant asHolidayPackageVariant() {
    return this.holidayPackageVariant;
  }

  public boolean equals(Object obj) {
    if (obj == this)
      return true;
    if (!(obj instanceof FlightHolidayPackageVariant))
      return false;

    FlightHolidayPackageVariant that = (FlightHolidayPackageVariant) obj;
    return Objects.equal(this.holidayPackageVariant, that.holidayPackageVariant)
        && Objects.equal(this.originCity, that.originCity);
  }

  @Override
  public int hashCode() {
    return Objects.hashCode(this.holidayPackageVariant, this.originCity);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I've been thinking about this. One question that comes to my mind is, in my HolidayPackage, I store a Set<HolidayPackageVariant> variants; to point to concrete implementations of HolidayPackageVariant i.e. LandHolidayPackageVariant and FlightHolidayPackageVariant. If I change it to composition then how do I store references to FlightHolidayPackageVariant in that set ? –  brainydexter Mar 28 '12 at 9:59
    
Do you really need to put them all in a single collection? Can't you use several collections that you can aggregate when needed using Guava's Iterables.transform(Iterable, Function) ? –  Olivier Grégoire Mar 28 '12 at 11:08

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