Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was working on a kernel which had much global memory access per thread so I copied them to local memory which gave a speed up of 40%, wanted still more speed up so copied from local to private which degraded the performance. So is it correct that I think we must not use to much private memory which may degrade the performance?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

Ashwin's answer is in the right direction but a little misleading.

OpenCL abstracts the address space of variables away from their physical storage, and there is not necessarily a 1:1 mapping between the two.

Consider OpenCL variables declared in the __private address space, which includes automatic non-pointer variables inside functions by default. The NVidia GPU implementation will physically allocate these in registers as far as possible, only spilling over to physical off-chip memory when there is insufficient register capacity. This particular off-chip memory is called "CUDA local" memory, and has similar performance characteristics to memory allocated for __global variables, which explains the performance penalty due to register spill-over. There is no such physical thing as "private memory" in this implementation, only a "private address space", which may be allocated on- or off-chip.

The performance hit is not a direct consequence of using the private address space (or "private memory"), which is typically allocated in high performance memory. It is because, under this implementation, the variable was too large to be allocated on high performance registers, and was therefore "spilled over" to off-chip memory.

share|improve this answer
add comment

In (GPU-like) OpenCL devices, the local memory is on-chip and close to the processing elements (PE). It might be as fast as accessing L1 cache. The private memory for each thread is actually apportioned from off-chip global memory. This is far from from the PE and might have a latency of hundreds of clock cycles, thus degrading the read-write performance.

share|improve this answer
    
if suppose lets take like a thread uses the global buffer value twice , than initially keep that value in private(register) reduces one global access giving performance . In these sense i am confused . Waiting for your replay. –  Megharaj Mar 27 '12 at 9:34
    
Megharaj: Note that private memory is not the same as registers. Although, if there is register spilling, private memory might be used for that. –  Ashwin Mar 27 '12 at 9:38
    
Thanks a lot for your answer(danyavadagalu). "This is far from from the PE and might have a latency of hundreds of clock cycles, thus degrading the read-write performance." why does it gives performance in this case below "if suppose lets take like a thread uses the global buffer value twice , than initially keep that value in private memory reduces one global access giving performance ". So what extent we must use private memory. Thank you. –  Megharaj Mar 27 '12 at 9:43
    
"the local memory is on-chip and close to the processing elements (PE). It might be as fast as accessing L1 cache" thanks a lot for this ya this makes sense i ll look into this .thanks again:) –  Megharaj Mar 27 '12 at 9:46
    
Sorry again to interrupt , I have written a median filter case which is faster than NVIDIA'S , In my program i copy from global memory to local memory(efficiently:)) i dont want to change loacal buffer values so i copy to private memory and perform operations gives performance. But using only local memory without copying to private degrades performance. But if performed by copying to private memory from local gives good performance. –  Megharaj Mar 27 '12 at 9:52
show 3 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.