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I am trying to learn how to convert ints into binary. it runs but this is the output: Enter a number: 33 New value: 16 Remainder: 1 Current VAlue: -17 Counter: 1

I appreciate any help. Thank you. Ok I am sorry my bad. The output should be: 00100001

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
  int nv, r, num;

  printf("Enter a number: ");
  scanf("%d",&num);

   int counter=0;
   while(num>=0)
   {
      nv=num/2;
      r=num%2;
      num=-(nv+r);
      counter++;

    printf("New Value: %d\n",nv);
    printf("Remainder: %d\n",r);
      printf("Current Value: %d",num);
   }
    printf("Counter: %d\n",counter);

}
share|improve this question
    
What exactly do you want to print? I mean, "convert to binary" is vague to begin with, but you also have four outputs for the input, which makes it totally unclear what you want. What are the outputs supposed to be for input=33? I mean, all I can think of is 00000000000000000000000000100001. – Mr Lister Mar 27 '12 at 8:51
    
Yes Sr. I already added another comment to explain. Yes that should be the output => 00100001. Thank you – Bart g Mar 27 '12 at 9:02
    
No, my point was all the other things you print; what should they be? Also, why 8 binary digits? That won't work for numbers over 255. And I don't see where you are trying to print exactly 8 binary digits. – Mr Lister Mar 27 '12 at 9:11
up vote 2 down vote accepted
num=-(nv+r);

Is obviously negative, since both nv and r are positives.

I suspect you actually wanted

num = nv

or:

num -= (nv + r)

Also note that your stop condition is num >= 0 - if you do the first change, you will get an infinite loop, since when you reach num ==0, you will divide by 2, and get nv == num /2 == 0 / 2 == 0 and assign nv back to num

(*)Note that also the second change will proide infinite loop: 0 % 2 == 0 and 0 / 2 == 0, so num -= (nv + r) == 0 - (0 + 0) == 0

share|improve this answer
    
Sure, he misread/miswrote the -= operator. +1 – user529758 Mar 27 '12 at 8:56
    
OOOOOOOH!!!!!!! THANK YOU VERY MUCH MR. amit I fixed the problem. FINALLY I got what I wanted for this part. This is just 1/4 of what I want to do jejeje one step at a time. – Bart g Mar 27 '12 at 9:09
    
@Bartg: You are welcome. One step at a time is a good approach! good luck! – amit Mar 27 '12 at 9:18

Is this what you were trying to accomplish?

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
   int nv, r, num;
   int counter=0;

   printf("Enter a number: ");
   scanf("%d",&num);

   while(num>0)
   {
      nv=num/2;
      r=num%2;
      num-=(nv+r);
      counter++;

      printf("New Value: %d\n",nv);
      printf("Remainder: %d\n",r);
      printf("Current Value: %d\n",num);
   }
   printf("Counter: %d\n",counter);
   return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
And what did he learn from seeing a complete not explained code? – amit Mar 27 '12 at 8:55
    
He was already quite close to the solution. And the edits I made to his code are simple enough. – vascop Mar 27 '12 at 9:00
    
Actually what Mr. VascoP did is just to fix some details(important) of MY CODE which I appreciate and unfortunately didn't work. – Bart g Mar 27 '12 at 9:01
    
You should explain what the changes are, it is hard to see one has changed num=-(nv+r) into num-=(nv+r). Also note: this code fails for num == 0 – amit Mar 27 '12 at 9:01
    
Thank you Mr. VascoP I appreciate your help. – Bart g Mar 27 '12 at 9:10

One easy way to do that is know that the machine store the number in binary. And what you need to do is only use this to print the number in binary.

int main()
{
   int val=1;
   int n=0;
   int num;

   printf("Enter a number: ");
   scanf("%d",&num);
   while(val <= num)
   {
        if(val & num) printf("bit %d is '1'\n", n);
        else printf("bit %d is '0'\n", n);
        n++;
        val<<=1;
   }

}

In this case the order is from the least significant to the most significant bit.

share|improve this answer

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