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I wonder how can I search for a certain pattern in file, but only AFTER another pattern appear and stop searching when it encounters the third pattern? For example, consider the following piece of text:

ServiceMsg  : X
Printing BlockList :
Block number: 1
ServiceMsg  : Y
ServiceType : GMAP_REQ (1)
Application Context:
Version : GSM_VERSION_3 (3)
Block number: 2
ServiceMsg  : Z

Here I want to search for the ServiceMsg pattern, however only after Block number appears and do not continue the search after additional Block number. Thus the result must be only ServiceMsg : Y.

EDIT:

These blocks come in threes:

.
Block number: 1
.
.
Block number: 2
.
.
Block number: 3
.

...And there it goes again

I want to be able to retrieve the occurrences of ServiceMsg between Block number: 1 and Block number: 2and also between Block number: 2 and Block number: 3.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
But do you need each occurence between Block number: 1 and Block number: 2 or just the first occurence between those? –  Jan Hudec Mar 27 '12 at 11:39
    
@Jan Hudec Hi. I want to be able to retrieve the occurrences of ServiceMsg between Block number: 1 and Block number: 2and also between Block number: 2 and Block number: 3. –  Eugene S Mar 27 '12 at 12:21
    
do not continue the search is in conflict with your new edit. –  user unknown Mar 27 '12 at 13:11
    
@user unknown I understand that it seems confusing, but what I meant is that I do not want to scan for ServiceMsg until certain Block number is reached. The moment Block number is reached, I want to continue scanning for ServiceMsg. In other words, I don't want to scan for ServiceMsg when not between blocks. Hope that makes it more clear. –  Eugene S Mar 27 '12 at 13:16
    
Ah, yes. Updated my answer with a test file. –  user unknown Mar 27 '12 at 13:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

update after question rewriting:

sed -n '/Block number:/,/ServiceMsg/{n;/ServiceMsg/p;g}' service.txt

Searches for ServiceMsg after Block number patterns (g)lobally. If it finds a ServiceMsg, it reads the (n)ext line, since the last line is not included. Then matches ServiceMsg, (p)rints it (g)lobally (not just once). -n prevents printing in general.

Test file:

ServiceMsg  : X
Printing BlockList :
Block number: 1
ServiceMsg  : Y
ServiceMsg  : fail
ServiceType : GMAP_REQ (1)
Application Context:
Version : GSM_VERSION_3 (3)
Block number: 2
ServiceMsg  : Z
Block number: 3
ServiceMsg  : end

Output:

ServiceMsg  : Y
ServiceMsg  : Z
ServiceMsg  : end
share|improve this answer

awk(1) is a useful tool for this job (I'm using gawk here):

awk -- '
    /pattern 1/ { matched = 1 }
    /pattern 2/ && matched { print }
    /pattern 3/ && matched { exit }
'
share|improve this answer

If the start and end patterns were unique, you would just do

sed -n '/start-pattern/,/end-pattern/s/searched-pattern/&/p'

but if there is also Block number: 3 and Block number: 4 and more down the line and you can't match on the whole line including the number, you will have to resort to awk or perl.

Edit: I supposed sed has the g command like ed, but it apparently does not, so we have to abuse s command. The & represents the original text, but of course different substitution may be done as needed.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your comments! Actually there are always 3 blocks like these which then repeat. I will add to the question. –  Eugene S Mar 27 '12 at 10:35
    
With the comments here and on the question, I think sed -n '/Block number: 1/,/Block number: 3/g/ServiceMsg:/p' should do what you want. Of course you can use s instead of g e.g. to strip the ServiceMsg: prefix or whatever. –  Jan Hudec Mar 27 '12 at 12:40
1  
I get a: sed: -e expression #1, char 37: extra characters after command –  user unknown Mar 27 '12 at 13:42
    
@userunknown: You are right. I assumed g will work in sed like it does in ed (and ex and vim), but it does not, so I modified the answer to use s command instead. –  Jan Hudec Mar 27 '12 at 13:56
    
And did you test it? Does it work? I get empty output. (It is unhandy to test, since you only provide the explaining form, which has to be redacted before testing). –  user unknown Mar 27 '12 at 15:06
awk '/^Block number:/ {b = !b} b && /^ServiceMsg/ {print}'

Update:

awk -F' *: +' '
    $1 == "Block number" {block = $2; found = 0}
    block && $1 == "ServiceMsg" {
        if (! found) {
            printf("block %s, %s\n", block, $0)
            found = 1
        }
    }
'
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