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I see in many examples about MVC, Repository pattern, Unit of Work and EF, for instance here, that both interfaces and classes implement the IDisposable interface. I guess this interface exposes just the method Dispose() with 2 overloads.

However in many other examples made by senior programmers, I do not see such implementation. Actually to me it seems quite logic that one a component is dismissed on every web request, since every request gets a brand new controller instance.

Or even if this is not the case, I guess by using a dependency injection framework such as Ninject, we delegate all this disposal tasks to the very framework.

It can also be the case that the implementation of IDisposable was required in older version of the EF or MVC framework.

Anybody might point me to the right direction?

UPDATE

The automatic disposal of the context can be seen in a layered application with Service and Repository layer. Assume that from both components we return IQueryable<T> objects, if we try to populate the objects from the controller, by iterating its items or call the ToList() method, we get a runtime error saying that the context is unreachable (closed)

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guess this interface exposes just the method Dispose() with 2 overloads - no, the interface defines 1 overload. The other belongs to the implementation pattern. –  Henk Holterman Mar 27 '12 at 9:15
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3 Answers

With regards the connection state, EF is supposed to be quite good at only keeping the connection open only while it's needed (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb896325.aspx). The link also shows how to get finer control over the connection state.

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Usually in most of the examples you can find on interner about Repository pattern using EF the Context has a Dispose method.

Now you don't strictly need to call the Dispose method on the Context but it may be a good practice for the reason below:

DataContext holds state (for example, a SqlConnection and pointers to the objects you have retrieved). These will eventually get cleaned up by the GC once you release all references, but some of these objects (for example, the underlying SqlConnection) may be holding resources that you typically want to release as soon as your are finished, rather than relying on the GC to clean up.

For lazy people: you can even wrap the context within a using statement which will call the dispose for you when the object get out from the scope of the using itself

more info at :

http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/forums/en-US/adodotnetentityframework/thread/2625b105-2cff-45ad-ba29-abdd763f74fe/

here you can also find an example that regarding Repository patter in EF

http://www.codeproject.com/Tips/309753/Repository-Pattern-with-Entity-Framework-4-1-and-C

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you don't strictly need to call the Dispose method - That might mean trouble when the visitor count goes up... –  Henk Holterman Mar 27 '12 at 9:25
    
Thanks, if I have service and repository layers and I return IQueryables<T> from both of them, even if I do not use "using" if I try to populate the object from the controller, I will get a runtime error because the context is unreachable (closed) –  CiccioMiami Mar 27 '12 at 9:27
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The common pattern is to have an instance of the Repository in every Controller and to link the Disposal into the Dispose() of the Controller.

So I would say the pattern is generally required.

However in many other examples made by senior programmers, I do not see such implementation.

There are a few possibilities:

  • it is Demo code, error and resource handling omitted.
  • the pattern is implemented in a non obvious place (base class)

Point to a concrete example and we can find out.

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Thanks, I mean for instance these tutorials asp.net/mvc/tutorials. Moreover if I have service and repository layers and I return IQueryables<T> from both of them, if I try to populate the object from the controller, I will get a runtime error because the context is unreachable (closed) –  CiccioMiami Mar 27 '12 at 9:25
    
Those tutorials seem to be 'demo code'. As for the IQueryable, write it out in the question. –  Henk Holterman Mar 27 '12 at 9:32
    
thanks see update –  CiccioMiami Mar 27 '12 at 9:47
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