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I have a file with my lines and I want to compare lines that are one after the other to test if they are the same except for the last column. For example:

example/example 321
example/example 456
otherexample/otherexample 321

In this case, I want the program to simply return:

example/example

As the first column matches, but the second column is different. What is the best way to do this using Unix tools? So far I have tried awk but have had little success. Thanks very much.

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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
# sample data
$ cat input.txt
example/example 321
example/example 456
example/example 789
otherexample/otherexample 321
abc
otherexample/otherexample 321

$ awk 'x==$1{print $1; while(getline){if(x!=$1)break}}{x=$1}' input.txt
example/example
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Thanks very much! Works like a charm. Though, I'm very new to awk and I'm not sure that I fully understand the inner workings of this code yet, so I have a few questions: 1. What is the difference between the '=='and '=' sign. I know that in many languages one sets a variable and the other tests equivalency, is that the same with awk? 2. Why is print $1; before the while loop instead of at the end? Thanks very much! –  samturner Mar 27 '12 at 9:46
    
== has the same meaning as in C++. You can put print $1 after the while...loop. –  kev Mar 27 '12 at 10:05
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you may use python, if it is installed on your machine, I think it is a very quick way to do the comparison check this post : python: comparing two strings

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One way:

Content of script.awk:

## In first line, get path and init counter of consecutive paths.
FNR == 1 { 
    path = $1
    repeats = 1 
    next
}

FNR > 1 { 
    ## If current path is same as previous one, increment counter.
    if ( path == $1 ) { 
        ++repeats;
    }   
    ## Else, there is new path, so print previous and init counter.
    else {
        print_repeated_path( repeats, path )
        path = $1
        repeats = 0 
    }   
}

END {
    print_repeated_path( repeats, path )
}

function print_repeated_path(r, path) {
    if ( r > 1 ) { 
        printf "%s\n", path
    }   
}

Content of infile:

example/example 321
example/example 456
otherexample/otherexample 321
other/example 456
other/example 678
other/example 123
otherexample/otherexample 321

Run it like:

awk -f script.awk infile

With following result:

example/example
other/example
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sort -u temp.txt|awk '{a[$1]++}END{for (i in a){if(a[i]>1)print i;}}'
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This might work for you:

cut -d' ' -f1 file | sort | uniq -d

or this:

 sort file | sed '$!N;/^\(\S*\) .*\n\1.*/!D;bb;:a;$!N;:b;s//\1/;ta;P;D'
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