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How to convert hexadecimal value into emoji icons , I have a string like below

NSString *myVal = @"1F61E";

how can i convert this text to display it as emoji charrcaters?

I have found that value from this link Please let me know, i am really stuck-up with this issue

Updated

NSString *utf8String1 = @"1F61E";
NSString *a = [self convert:utf8String1];
NSLog(@"%@ &&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&",a);


-(NSString*)convert:(NSString*)decoded{

    unichar unicodeValue = (unichar) strtol([decoded UTF8String], NULL, 16);
    char buffer[2];
    int len = 1;

    if (unicodeValue > 127) {
        buffer[0] = (unicodeValue >> 8) & (1 << 8) - 1;
        buffer[1] = unicodeValue & (1 << 8) - 1; 
        len = 2;
    } else {
        buffer[0] = unicodeValue;
    }

    return [[NSString alloc] initWithBytes:buffer length:len encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding];



}
share|improve this question
    
Check this answer on SO which explains exactly this: stackoverflow.com/questions/1775859/… –  akosma Mar 27 '12 at 11:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The code point that you are trying to encode does not fit in 16 bits. Therefore you need to use UTF-32 encoding:

NSScanner *scan = [[NSScanner alloc] initWithString:@"1F61E"];
unsigned int val;
[scan scanHexInt:&val];
char cc[4];
cc[3] = (val >> 0) & 0xFF;
cc[2] = (val >> 8) & 0xFF;
cc[1] = (val >> 16) & 0xFF;
cc[0] = (val >> 24) & 0xFF;
NSString *s = [[NSString alloc]
    initWithBytes:cc
           length:4
         encoding:NSUTF32StringEncoding];
NSLog(@"[%@]", s);
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the reply.how can i convert my variable to this format 0x00, 0x01, 0cf6, 0x1e? pls let me know –  user198725878 Mar 27 '12 at 13:15
    
@user198725878 Please see my edit. –  dasblinkenlight Mar 27 '12 at 13:20
    
Thanks a lot for your help, pls can you explain me how it works –  user198725878 Mar 28 '12 at 3:32
    
@user198725878 Sure! NSScanner converts your hex value to a 4-byte unsigned int, four >> and & 0xFF operations "cut out" individual 8-bit portions into a 4-byte array of char, and finally a string is constructed from these four bytes with a NSUTF32StringEncoding flag, which says that each string character is encoded as a four-byte UNICODE code point. –  dasblinkenlight Mar 28 '12 at 10:09

Your first step is to convert it to it's numerical value:

unichar unicodeValue = (unichar) strtol([input UTF8String], NULL, 16);

Then, following from the rules of this post:

char buffer[2];
int len = 1;

if (unicodeValue > 127) {
    buffer[0] = (unicodeValue >> 8) & (1 << 8) - 1;
    buffer[1] = unicodeValue & (1 << 8) - 1; 
    len = 2;
} else {
    buffer[0] = unicodeValue;
}

return [[NSString alloc] initWithBytes:buffer length:len encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding];

You now have your UTF-8 Formatted string!

share|improve this answer
    
hi, thanks for the reply.will this result of that nsstring would be emoji icons? or do i need to still do anything to get displayed.pls let me know –  user198725878 Mar 27 '12 at 12:05
    
@user198725878 sorry, I don't have a device to test this on, you'd have to try for yourself! –  Richard J. Ross III Mar 27 '12 at 12:06
    
when i tried printing return nsstring value using nslog it just displays me as"(null)"pls let me know –  user198725878 Mar 27 '12 at 12:18
    
please let me know –  user198725878 Mar 27 '12 at 12:32
    
@user198725878 that looks right, does it output as expected? –  Richard J. Ross III Mar 27 '12 at 12:37

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