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In Concrete Abstractions, there is this example of recursion:

(define subtract-the-first (lambda (n)
                             (if (= n 0) 0
                                 (- (subtract-the-first (- n 1)) n))))

This I understand. For instance, if n = 3, this function evaluates to: (- (+ (+ (+ 1) 2) 3)) -> -6

However, in one of the follow-up examples, one is supposed to explain why it's not possible to switch the order of operations. For instance, let's look at this:

(define subtract-the-first2 (lambda (n)
                             (if (= n 0) 0
                                 (- n (subtract-the-first2 (- n 1))))))

If I call (subtract-the-first2 4), the result is 2. However, I don't quite understand the evaluation. Obviously, I am making a mistake here, because see this: (- 4 (+ 3 (+ 2 (+ 1))) ), which is equal to (- 4 6) and thus evaluates to -2.

I appreciate any pointers as I've been banging me head against the wall for half an hour or so already...

Thank you!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can check the evaluation of this function by adding some semiquotes and unquotes:

(define subtract-the-first2 (lambda (n)
                              (if (= n 0) 0
                                `(- ,n ,(subtract-the-first2 (- n 1))))))

Then evaluate:

> (subtract-the-first2 4)
(- 4 (- 3 (- 2 (- 1 0))))

This evaluates to 2. (I don't see where you got the pluses...)

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Thank you very much! I made some wrong assumption about the evaluation, but it's all clear now. –  talkinghead Mar 27 '12 at 12:11

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