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A single row in a table has a column with an integer value >= 1 and must be selected however many times the column says. So if the column had '2', I'd like the select query to return the single-row 2 times.

How can this be accomplished?

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Will there be more rows in the table that should be replicated appropriately or is it always just the one row? –  Michael Haren Jun 12 '09 at 20:38
4  
Also, can you give us an indication on why you're using this approach? There might be an cleaner solution. –  Dana the Sane Jun 12 '09 at 20:40
    
This is a very odd requirement, are you dealing with a legacy app that needs this format? Though, if you have control of the select statement being passed in, can't you just use a loop in your application code instead? –  MkV Jun 13 '09 at 10:41
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3 Answers

Don't know why you would want to do such a thing, but...

CREATE TABLE testy (a int,b text);
INSERT INTO testy VALUES (3,'test');
SELECT testy.*,generate_series(1,a) from testy;  --returns 3 rows
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You could make a table that is just full of numbers, like this:

CREATE TABLE numbers
(
  num INT NOT NULL
, CONSTRAINT numbers_pk PRIMARY KEY (num)
);

and populate it with as many numbers as you need, starting from one:

INSERT INTO numbers VALUES(1);
INSERT INTO numbers VALUES(2);
INSERT INTO numbers VALUES(3);
...

Then, if you had the table "mydata" that han to repeat based on the column "repeat_count" you would query it like so:

SELECT mydata.*
FROM mydata
JOIN numbers
ON numbers.num <= mydata.repeat_count
WHERE ...

If course you need to know the maximum repeat count up front, and have your numbers table go that high.

No idea why you would want to do this thought. Care to share?

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If whoever the down-voter was reads this, care to share why? Not wanting to argue, just curious for my own edification. –  Evan Jun 15 '09 at 1:27
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You can do it with a recursive query, check out the examples in the postgresql docs.

something like

WITH RECURSIVE t(cnt, id, field2, field3) AS (
        SELECT 1, id, field2, field3
        FROM foo
      UNION ALL
        SELECT t.cnt+1, t.id, t.field2, t.field3
        FROM t, foo f
        WHERE t.id = f.id and t.cnt < f.repeat_cnt
)
SELECT id, field2, field3 FROM t;
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Only in 8.4 which is only beta still. –  rfusca Jun 13 '09 at 3:20
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