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public abstract class HolidayPackageVariant {
private HolidayPackage holidayPackage;
private String typeHolidayPackage;

@Override
    public int hashCode() {
        return Objects.hashCode(getTypeHolidayPackage(), getHolidayPackage());
    }
}

public final class FlightHolidayPackageVariant extends HolidayPackageVariant{
private Destination originCity;

@Override
    public int hashCode() {
        // need to add super.hashCode() here somehow ?
        return Objects.hashCode(getOriginCity() );
    }
}

Google guava hashode(): Objects.hashCode works on member objects. How do I specify super class hashCode() in the derived::hashCode() ? I can directly use super.members in the derived class hashCode() function, but if the super.hashCode() changes in any way, that will not be reflected in the derived:hashCode(...).

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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Sorry for the non-answer but: this is probably not really what you want to do. Effective Java has a long exploration of why subclassing a value type to add an additional value component is a bad idea. In the second edition, it's Item 8, "Obey the general contract when overriding equals." Also see Item 16, "Favor composition over inheritance."

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Lately, someone also suggested me something similar and honestly I feel very confused at this point. I'd appreciate if you can take a look at how/why I arrived at this design. It evolved from a question I asked here: programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/140967/… with this as the backend DB design: dba.stackexchange.com/questions/14663/… and am using Hibernate as the ORM. I'd appreciate if you can point me in the right direction. –  brainydexter Mar 27 '12 at 19:30
1  
I read Item 8, 16 and even 20. I understand the consequences. However, I'd like to point out something in my case: base class HolidayPackageVariant is an abstract class, with LandHolidayPackageVariant and FlightHolidayPackageVariant being final concrete implementations. I also thought of tagged classes, but from Effective Java, it seems that I am doing the right thing since both variants refer to a HolidayPackage, a reference to which is stored in the base class HolidayPackageVariant. What do you think ? –  brainydexter Mar 28 '12 at 11:45

The hashcode is itself an (auto-boxed Integer) object, so just include super.hashCode() in the objects that make up the hash:

public int hashCode() {
    return Objects.hashCode(getOriginCity(), super.hashCode());
}
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I took a look at the hashCode function for Objects and it expects object as an argument. Can you explain what do you mean by hashcode is itself an (autoboxed) object ? –  brainydexter Mar 27 '12 at 12:13
2  
hashcode() returns an int which will be autoboxed into an Integer. –  Olivier Grégoire Mar 27 '12 at 12:15

Your class only has one new data member, so there is no need to use Objects.hashCode(Object...). Try this instead:

public int hashCode() {
    Destination oc = getOriginCity();
    return 31 * super.hashCode() + (null == oc ? 0 : oc.hashCode());
}

If you have many new data members in the subclass, something like this would also work:

public int hashCode() {
    return 31 * super.hashCode() + Objects.hashCode(getOriginCity(), getOtherData(), getMoreData());
}
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