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I want to create a temporary file on linux while making sure that the file will disappear after my program has terminated, even if it got killed or someone performs a hard reboot in the wrong moment. Does tmpfile() handle all this for me?

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@JarrodRoberson I'll re-add the [race-condition] tag - this is all about the time window between open() and unlink(). –  thejh Mar 27 '12 at 12:54
    
@JarrodRoberson: Uh, aren't you talking about a deadlock? My definition of "race condition" is something like "there are some parallel processes and depending on how fast they are in their race, different things happen". Let's look what the english wikipedia says: "A race condition or race hazard is a flaw in an electronic system or process whereby the output or result of the process is unexpectedly and critically dependent on the sequence or timing of other events." –  thejh Mar 27 '12 at 14:02
    
"A race condition occurs when a program doesn't work as it's supposed to because of an unexpected ordering of events that produces contention over the same resource." I was assuming that from your comments your concern was specifically on a dead-lock which is a result of trying to remediate a race-condition ( contention of the shared resource ). It is still not clear what your concern is, calling tmpfile() and having the program exit abnormally before calling unlink() is the least of your worries if your application is really that fragile. –  Jarrod Roberson Mar 27 '12 at 14:08
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6 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You seem pre-occupied with the idea that files might get left behind some how because of some race condition, I don't see an explanation of why this is a concern.

"A race condition occurs when a program doesn't work as it's supposed to because of an unexpected ordering of events that produces contention over the same resource."

I was assuming that from your comments on other answers your concern was specifically on a dead-lock which is a result of trying to remediate a race-condition ( contention of the shared resource ). It is still not clear what your concern is, calling tmpfile() and having the program exit abnormally before that function gets to call unlink() is the least of your worries if your application is really that fragile.

Given that there isn't any mention of concurrency, threading or other processes sharing this file descriptor to this temp file, I still don't see the possibility for a race condition, maybe the concept of an incomplete logical transaction, but that can be detected and cleaned up.

The correct way to make absolutely sure that any allocated file system resources are cleaned up is not solely on exit of an application but also also on start-up. All my server code, makes sure that everything is cleaned up from a previous run before it starts and makes itself available.

Put your temp files in a sub-dir in /tmp make sure your application cleans this sub-dir on startup and normal shutdown. You can wrap your app start up with a shell script that detects abnormal ( kill -9 ) shutdown based on PID existence and also does clean up activities.

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Cleaning on start is not that easy if there might be multiple instances of my program, right? Also, IMO, you can speak of a "race" between a killer process and temporary file creation. –  thejh Mar 28 '12 at 12:57
    
"multiple instances" is a form of concurrency is isn't mentioned at all in your question. If it is a concern you need to edit your question and supply all the relevant concerns, right now there from your extended comments on all the answers the question is not complete as worded. –  Jarrod Roberson Mar 28 '12 at 16:27
    
Well, I could add "multiple instances", yes. But I could also add "not the only program on the system", "not necessarily running as root" and so on - aren't all of these things kind of normal? –  thejh Mar 29 '12 at 8:39
    
no one can read your mind on what assumptions you are making, what you consider normal assumptions are subjective. My assumptions is a temp file created by an application is kind of specific to just that instance of that application and a private implementation detail, and anything else is a leaky abstraction and a design flaw. –  Jarrod Roberson Mar 29 '12 at 12:32
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according to tmpfile() man page:

The file will be automatically deleted when it is closed or the program terminates.

I have not tested, but it seems it should do what you want.

Moreover:

The default location, if TMPDIR is not set, is /tmp.

Then, when a reboot is produced, /tmp will be empty.

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Have a look at glibc/stdio-common/tmpfile.c. As far as I can tell, it first creates a file, then unlinks it. –  thejh Mar 27 '12 at 12:50
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If you don't want to use tmpfile(), you can unlink() your file immediately after creating it. It will stay open and present and allocated until it is closed.

But on a hard reboot, a fsck might be needed in order to recover the space. But as this is always the case, it is no special drawback of this approach.

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So even with this approach, if the unlikely case occurs that my program dies between open() and unlink(), there's an empty, useless file, right? Well, I guess that's a lot better than a big, useless file whenever the program crashes... –  thejh Mar 27 '12 at 12:30
    
@thejh Right. This was my thought as well... –  glglgl Mar 27 '12 at 13:01
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EDIT: Yes

I checked the tmpfile source, and it does indeed use glglgl trick, and instantly unlocks the file.

Original:

I would say no. Got killed should work, but I would assume that it can happen, that after a hard reboot (e.g. due to power outtake) the file is still there. But that depends on your Linux distribution and the used settings.

If the temp file is created in a ramdisk, it is gone (there are unix distris out there that e.g. use a ram based tmpfs for temporary files).

Or if you use an environment that has certain policy regarding tmp, it could be also gone (maybe not instant, but often there are policies, like e.g. remove all files in /tmp that are not accessed within one month), but it could be also on a standard file system where such rules are not enforced. In this case the file would stay.

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"instantly"? As in "no race condition" or as in "small time window"? I'd say "small time window"... –  thejh Mar 27 '12 at 12:51
    
with "instantly" I mean, in the call of tmpfile. The deletion happens not at the end of the program via atexit (or similar). But it is not "instant" as in - "no race condition". There is a small time window were there open is issued but the unlink not. Thats why I left my original comments in the post, because it offers solutions to the race (like ram disk or /tmp policy). –  flolo Mar 27 '12 at 12:55
    
Well, cleaning /tmp sounds like a workaround that should be feasible... although on a server, doing it on boot only is probably a bad idea. I guess a cronjob or so should do it for things my programs create, just delete all of their files that are unopened... but it still feels bad. –  thejh Mar 27 '12 at 13:06
    
@thejh: Most distributions already have such a system. Afaik Ubuntu checks at boot time, RedHat/Fedora/CentOs has a cronjob checking daily for it. There you should check which distribution you got and how it is setup. –  flolo Mar 27 '12 at 13:23
    
Hmm, I'm on fedora and as it seems, it doesn't do that... –  thejh Mar 27 '12 at 13:30
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The customary approach is to set up a signal handler to clean up if the program is interrupted. This will not handle kill -9 or a physical reboot, which can't be trapped. Create temporary files in /tmp, which is normally cleaned out when the system boots. All that remains then is to teach people not to use kill -9 when they don't need to, but that appears to be an uphill battle.

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Hmmm... sometimes you just have to kill -9 something. Well, I guess you're right about /tmp - I should really wipe it from time to time (heck, I have files from 2011 in that folder). However, I don't like the thought that there's no clean way to do this... –  thejh Mar 27 '12 at 12:27
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In linux, mktemp command works.

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