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I have a few SQL (Select/Update/Insert) syntax that I will run inside PL/SQL one after another

is there any way to check if each syntax completed correctly and if there is some error it will not halt the whole PL/SQL, it will just return "OK" or "Not OK" to a variable so I can use it with IF?

UPDATE

I came up with this function, but it dose not seems to work, it returns 0 all time!

create or replace
FUNCTION EXECUTE_SQL(
      V_SQL IN VARCHAR2 )
    RETURN NUMBER
  AS
    V_RESULTS NUMBER := 1;
  BEGIN
    BEGIN
      EXECUTE IMMEDIATE V_SQL;
    EXCEPTION
    WHEN OTHERS THEN
      -- the following line is just for debugging!
      dbms_output.put_line(SQLERRM);
      V_RESULTS:= 0;
    END;
    RETURN V_RESULTS;
  END EXECUTE_SQL;

what is wrong wit it (if any)! cheers

share|improve this question
1  
what do you pass to the function in v_sql? And what does dbms_output.put_line print? –  René Nyffenegger Mar 27 '12 at 14:32
3  
Warning: WHEN OTHERS THEN without a RAISE makes Tom Kyte cry. –  Jeffrey Kemp Mar 28 '12 at 4:55
    
@René v_sql can be any SQL syntax! and dbms_output.put_line(SQLERRM); is just to see if the function woks! I will delete it once the function works, that's it! –  Data-Base Mar 28 '12 at 8:26
1  
@Data-Base: I do understand that you will remove dbms_output.put_line. But it's there in order to find out why the function returns 0 all the time. I have tried the function and got it working with some dml functions. Maybe you need more privileges, maybe the statement in v_sql is wrong but this is hard to tell for me/us if you don't either post the value for v_sql and, probably more importantly, what sqlerrm is. –  René Nyffenegger Mar 28 '12 at 11:49
1  
@Data-Base, no, you have WHEN OTHERS, and you do nothing but call dbms_output (which could have no effect) and set v_results := 0;. You're effectively saying "I don't care in which of zillions of ways this might fail, I want this procedure to continue running anyway." –  Jeffrey Kemp Mar 29 '12 at 3:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
if sql%rowcount > 0 then
   -- insert or update statement affected sql%rowcount rows
end if;

As for the correct syntax: if the syntax is wrong, it won't even compile. If there's a data consistency error (such as divide by 0 error, or primary key violation) an exception will be thrown. Such exception can be caught in exception handlers

In the exception handler, you can then check sqlerrm for more details:

 begin
    update t set x = ...
 exception when others then
    dbms_output.put_line(SQLERRM);
 end;

There are also a few predefined exceptions that you can check on:

 begin
           update t set x = ...
 exception
    when DUP_VAL_ON_INDEX
         -- primary key or unique key violation
    when OTHERS
         -- other kind of exception
  end;
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, I updated my question based on your answer, hope you can help me, cheers –  Data-Base Mar 27 '12 at 14:23
1  
"if the syntax is wrong, it won't even compile" The SQL is being run by execute immediate so it won't be checked at compile time. It's completely possible to pass in invalid sql to the function. –  Burhan Ali Mar 28 '12 at 22:15
    
@Burhan Ali: At the time when I've written this, the question was not edited and there was no mention of execute immediate, and the syntax referred to any "ordinary" sql statement not passed through execute immediate. So, at that time the remark was completely correct. –  René Nyffenegger Mar 29 '12 at 4:31
    
@RenéNyffenegger Ah, ok. Makes sense. –  Burhan Ali Mar 29 '12 at 5:00

If the syntax is not correct the entire block will be invalid, so you'll not be able to run it.

If you want to run all statements, despite that one can raise an exception, you can:

BEGIN

  BEGIN
    statement1;
  EXCEPTION 
    when exception1 then 
      some commands or null;
    when exception2 then 
      some commands or null;
  END;

  BEGIN
    statement2;
  EXCEPTION 
    when exception3 then 
      some commands or null;
    when exception4 then 
      some commands or null;
  END;

  etc.
END;
share|improve this answer
    
that was nice answer, to make things easier I made a function so I can call it many times!. please take a look at my updated question! cheers –  Data-Base Mar 27 '12 at 14:24

Write show errors

begin 
           update t set x = ... 
 exception 
    when DUP_VAL_ON_INDEX 
         -- primary key or unique key violation 
    when OTHERS 
         -- other kind of exception 
  end; 
/
show errors

It will show errors if any.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, please take a look at my updated question! cheers –  Data-Base Mar 27 '12 at 14:25

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