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C++: Forward declaration of class doesn't seem to work?

#include <iostream>
#include <string>


class BigObject;
using namespace std;
int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    BigObject one;

    string str = "this is a stirng";
    cout<<str;
}

class BigObject {
public:
    BigObject(){
        cout<<"big object \n";
    }
    virtual ~BigObject(){}      
};

Untitled.cpp:8:12: error: variable has incomplete type 'BigObject'

BigObject one;

^ Untitled.cpp:5:7: note: forward declaration of 'BigObject' class BigObject;

^ 1 error generated.

Why this can't be compiled?

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marked as duplicate by Jon, Nawaz, crashmstr, Luchian Grigore, luke Mar 27 '12 at 13:05

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
There are dozens of similar questions here. Look at the sidebar on the right. –  Jon Mar 27 '12 at 12:44
    
Forward declarations don't work the way you are trying to use it, the related questions that Jon points out might help. –  crashmstr Mar 27 '12 at 12:48
1  
See this question to understand what you can do with an incomplete (forward-declared) type. –  Luc Touraille Mar 27 '12 at 14:52

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A C++ compiler is not required to look forward how a class is implemented when compiling uses of it, so the class definition must have been already seen when the first use of the object happens.

What you can however do is for example use pointers to instances of classes that are going to be defined later (but you're not allowed to create/destroy instances, call methods or access members).

The C++ compiler has the ability to do this "forward scan" only inside a class, where for example you can call one method from another or you can use data members that are going to be defined later in the class.

struct Foo
{
    void foo() { x = 12; bar(); } // valid
    void bar() {}; // even if bar is after foo in the class
    int x; // and even if the data member is after foo in the class
};

There is no such ability at the compilation unit level and there's no logical reason I can think to for this limitation.

It's just how the language was designed.

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The compiler doesn't know anything about the constructor of BigObject, or anything about how to allocate memory for the object by the time it parses the main function.

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So I must use #include at here ? –  kran Mar 27 '12 at 12:48

BigOne has not defined a constructor when used first time. You can simply put first of all BigObject definition, like this:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

class BigObject {
public:
    BigObject() {
        cout << "big object \n";
    }
    virtual ~BigObject() {
    }
};

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    BigObject one;

    string str = "this is a stirng";
    cout << str;
}
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Forward declaration is okay when you want to declare an object ( for example in a header file ) where it is not yet known.

Forward Declaration doesn't do the deal when you actually want to initialize the object. You are calling the constructor of BigObject in your main. But at this point the compiler just knows that there is some kind of object named BigObject but he doesn't know to initialize it.

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In this example scenario forward declaration isn't needed. You have 2 options (at least):

  1. Put the definition of BigObject in a separate header file BigObject.h and #include that in the .cpp

  2. Put the definition of BigObject before the main() method.

Option 1 is preferable as you can #include BigObject.h in other cpp files also.

The typical use of forward decl is when you are writing a class that includes another class in it's definition but you don't want to explicitly include the header, you can make the compiler happy by putting a forward decl. meaning you are telling that at link time the definition will be made available. Then in your main you will #include the header for the class you forward declared.

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