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I'm a little confused about how to properly declare a class inherited from a template class.

The base class looks like so (not including the irrelevant bits):

template <class Writer>
class Node
{
    Writer* writer;
    ...
public:
    Node (std::string& root);
...
}

What is the proper way to declare and construct an inherited class of this? I thought something like:

template <class Writer>
class IndexNode : public Node
{...}

However, doing so is giving me "expected class-name before '{' token". I've tried commenting out the template declaration in the inherited class, thinking that maybe the template declaration itself was inherited from the parent, but that did not help either, and also tried

class IndexNode : template <class Writer> public Node
{...}

, thinking maybe the template had to be explicitly attached to the base class. I figured rather than continue to take a stab at the right combination, I'd ask for assistance and hopefully learn something that will make me understand the reasons why also.

Thanks!

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Just a side note: it is customary to write the template arguments (in your case Writer) by a single capitalized letter. A full name usually creates confusion as to whether the class is a template argument or a known class. –  Shahbaz Mar 27 '12 at 13:10
    
noted, and will make that change. I've just started working with templates. Thanks! –  Tom Thorogood Mar 27 '12 at 13:12
2  
@Shahbaz: I completely disagree with this advice. By restricting the name of template parameters to a single letter, you greatly obfuscate your code: Writer indicates that the type I'm dealing with is, well, a writer; W does not indicate anything. Moreover, stating that this is a customary practice is plain wrong (see for example the names given to the template parameters of standard algorithms: they clearly indicate what types of iterators are expected). If you really want to indicate that a name denote a template parameter, you can use the .Net convention and prefix the name with a T. –  Luc Touraille Mar 27 '12 at 14:59
    
@LucTouraille I am saying this because I have been reading it around. For example here in section 3.1.8, it indicates this is a common practice. Searching further though, it seems like it really depends –  Shahbaz Mar 27 '12 at 15:38
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4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Is your derived class also a template?

Yes:

template <class Writer>
class IndexNode : public Node<Writer>
{
   //...
}

No:

class IndexNode : public Node<SomeClassThatSpecializezNode>
{
   //...
}
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Yep; when inheriting from a template class, you must supply the parameter. –  Grimm The Opiner Mar 27 '12 at 13:08
    
Thanks for the second option! That will also be a help in the future. –  Tom Thorogood Mar 27 '12 at 13:09
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It would be as below you need to instantiate the correct base class type.

template<class Writer>
class IndexNode: public Node<Writer>
{
};
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That did it! Thanks so much. –  Tom Thorogood Mar 27 '12 at 13:08
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Well that depends. If your inherited class uses a SpecificWriter class you would do

class IndexNode : public Node<SpecificWriter>
{
};

If otoh your inherited class should also be templatized do

template <typename Writer>
class IndexNode : public Node<Writer>
{
};
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Write

template<class Writer>
class IndexNode : public Node<Writer>

if Writer should be a template argument of IndexNode.

Write

class IndexNode : public Node<Writer>

if Writer is a known class.

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