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I wrote this function to communicate with an external program. Such program takes input from stdin and prints its output on stdout. In order to make my code communicate with this program I redirect the stdin and stdout to buffers using pipes.

int query_oracle(mpz * c,int *t, mpz * m) {
  int out_pipe[2];
  int in_pipe[2];
  int saved_stdout;
  int saved_stdin;

  // REDIRECT STDIN
  saved_stdin = dup(STDIN_FILENO);      /* save stdin for later */
  pipe(in_pipe);            /* make a pipe */
  close(STDIN_FILENO);
  dup2(in_pipe[0], STDIN_FILENO);   /* redirect pipe to stdin */
  //write(in_pipe[1], in_buf, strlen(in_buf));

  // REDIRECT STDOUT
  saved_stdout = dup(STDOUT_FILENO);  /* save stdout for display later */
  if( pipe(out_pipe) != 0 ) {          /* make a pipe */
  exit(1);
  }
  dup2(out_pipe[1], STDOUT_FILENO);   /* redirect stdout to the pipe */
  close(out_pipe[1]);

  /* Some reads and writes on the pipes occur here 
   * so that the program can communicate with an 
   * external program*/

  dup2(saved_stdout, STDOUT_FILENO);    /* reconnect stdout */
  dup2(saved_stdin, STDIN_FILENO);  /* reconnect stdin */

  return 0;
}

the problem is that the 204th time I invoke this function, pipe() returns me an error (-1)! Any idea why is that, or how can I avoid it? thanks a lot

further details: This is on Linux. The result of uname -a is:

 Linux snowy.*****.ac.uk 2.6.32-71.el6.x86_64 #1 SMP Fri May 20 03:51:51 BST 2011 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux
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2  
What is the value or errno at the time of the error? –  trojanfoe Mar 27 '12 at 13:24
1  
man 3 errno, ulimit -n and check how many open file descriptors you have in that process. –  Nikolai N Fetissov Mar 27 '12 at 13:24
2  
Better yet, what is the value of strerror(errno)? –  larsmans Mar 27 '12 at 13:24
    
@larsmans "Operation not permitted" –  eddy ed Mar 27 '12 at 13:31
    
@NikolaiNFetissov how do I do that? –  eddy ed Mar 27 '12 at 13:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

As many of you suggested, the problem was I neglected to close file descriptors before returning from the function, so I soon ran out of available ones.

Here it follows the revised (working) version of the code

int query_oracle(mpz * c,int *t, mpz * m) {
  int out_pipe[2];
  int in_pipe[2];
  int saved_stdout;
  int saved_stdin;

  // REDIRECT STDIN
  saved_stdin = dup(STDIN_FILENO);      /* save stdin for later */
  pipe(in_pipe);            /* make a pipe */
  close(STDIN_FILENO);
  dup2(in_pipe[0], STDIN_FILENO);   /* redirect pipe to stdin */
  //write(in_pipe[1], in_buf, strlen(in_buf));

  // REDIRECT STDOUT
  saved_stdout = dup(STDOUT_FILENO);  /* save stdout for display later */
  if( pipe(out_pipe) != 0 ) {          /* make a pipe */
  exit(1);
  }
  dup2(out_pipe[1], STDOUT_FILENO);   /* redirect stdout to the pipe */
  close(out_pipe[1]);

  /* Some reads and writes on the pipes occur here 
   * so that the program can communicate with an 
   * external program*/

  dup2(saved_stdout, STDOUT_FILENO);    /* reconnect stdout */
  dup2(saved_stdin, STDIN_FILENO);  /* reconnect stdin */

  /* close all open file descriptors */
  close(in_pipe[1]);
  close(in_pipe[0]);
  close(out_pipe[1]);
  close(out_pipe[0]);
  close(saved_stdin);
  close(saved_stdout);

  return 0;
}
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You're perhaps running our of file descriptors. It appears you may not be closing in_pipe[1] and out_pipe[0] in the program after you've forked the remote program, or ever for that matter.

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1  
And saved_stdout and saved_stdin making 4 * 204 ~= 1024 (the likely fd limit). –  trojanfoe Mar 27 '12 at 13:30
1  
This would give EMFILE, but the OP seems to be getting EPERM. –  larsmans Mar 27 '12 at 13:34
    
@larsmans I don't think he is. I'd like to see the revised code. –  trojanfoe Mar 27 '12 at 13:37
    
I solved the problem. Thanks a lot. As you suggested I had so many open file descriptors I completely neglected to close. Now that I close them before returning from the function everything works fine. Thanks a lot everybody –  eddy ed Mar 27 '12 at 13:42
    
For the record you can see open file descriptors in linux under /proc/<pid>/fd directory. It's interesting to watch that for growth for any long-term running service. –  gravitron Mar 27 '12 at 20:43

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