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I've got a table in which there are some columns with big text data. The query for 10 rows (table has only 31 records) takes more than 20 seconds. If I remove fields with big size, the query is executed quickly. The query for 1 row (by id) always executed quickly.

How can I do the query for many rows work more faster?

The query looks like this

SELECT DISTINCT (a.id), a.field_1, a.field_2, a.field_3
    , a.field_4, a.field_5, a.filed_6, ...  
FROM table_a a, table_b b 
WHERE a.field_8 = 'o'  
ORDER BY a.field_2 DESC 
LIMIT 10;
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1  
DISTINCT is not a function. The syntax you are using will not do a distinct on the ID column only but on all columns! –  a_horse_with_no_name Mar 27 '12 at 14:22
    
@a_horse_with_no_name, Yes, you are right! Now it more faster, but not so fast as we would like. Maybe there are something else? –  Nick Mar 27 '12 at 14:57
    
Performance analysis without a query plan is mostly guesswork, please post output of EXPLAIN ANALYZE on your query after correcting the DISTINCT ON –  dbenhur Mar 27 '12 at 17:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

@a_horse already hinted at the likely syntax error. Try:

SELECT DISTINCT ON (a.id)  a.id, a.field_1, a.field_2, a.field_3, ...
FROM   table_a a
-- JOIN table_b b ON ???
WHERE  a.field_8 = 'o'  
ORDER  BY a.id, a.field_2 DESC 
LIMIT  10;

Note the bold emphasis and read up on the DISTINCT clause in the manual.

Also, an index on field_8 might help.
A multicolumn index on (field_8, id, field_2) might help even more, if you can narrow it down to that (and if that is the sort order you want, which I doubt).

If you want the result sorted by a.field_2 DESC first: In PostgreSQL 9.1, if id is the primary key:

SELECT a.id, a.field_1, a.field_2, a.field_3, ...
FROM   table_a a
-- JOIN table_b b ON ???
WHERE  a.field_8 = 'o'
GROUP  BY a.id   -- primary key takes care of all columns in table a
ORDER  BY a.field_2 DESC 
LIMIT  10;
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I have studied the question with DISTINCT. When I use GROUP BY a.id the postgres wants, that I used all columns of table in group by section. –  Nick Mar 27 '12 at 15:45
    
As I mentioned, this works for version 9.1 (or later) where the primary key covers the whole table. You neglected to mention your version of PostgreSQL, that makes it hard to help. For earlier versions, repeat all non-aggregated columns of the SELECT list in the GROUP BY clause or use DISTINCT ON (id) in a subquery and apply ORDER BY / LIMIT in the outer query. –  Erwin Brandstetter Mar 27 '12 at 19:35

why you are selecting table_b? you dont join this tables! make a real join like this

SELECT DISTINCT
    (a.id), a.field_1, a.field_2, a.field_3, a.field_4, a.field_5, a.filed_6 
FROM table_a a
INNER JOIN table_b b
    ON b.field_on_table_b = a.field_on_table_a
WHERE a.field_8 = 'o'
ORDER BY a.field_2 DESC LIMIT 10

then be sure that field_8 (in the where statement) is defined with a key!

share|improve this answer
    
The real query is very big. It was generated by an engine. The join does not affect on the speed of query. –  Nick Mar 27 '12 at 14:28

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