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I have a text file (basically an error log with date, timestamp and some data) in the following pattern:

mm/dd/yy 12:00:00:0001  
This is line 1
This is line 2

mm/dd/yy 12:00:00:0004  
This is line 3
This is line 4
This is line 5


mm/dd/yy 12:00:00:0004
This is line 6
This is line 7

I'm new at Perl and need to write a script that searches the file for timestamps and merges the data that have the same timestamp in it.

I'm expecting the following output for the above sample.

mm/dd/yy 12:00:00:0001  
This is line 1
This is line 2

mm/dd/yy 12:00:00:0004  
This is line 3
This is line 4
This is line 5
This is line 6
This is line 7

What's the best way to get this done?

share|improve this question
    
From a non-Perlish person: It seems to me that you could loop through each line, and test if it matches your timestamp regex. If so, you save it; if it is the same as the last saved timestamp, you delete it. –  Michael Myers Jun 12 '09 at 21:38
    
will the timestamps be sorted, or in other words can timestamp A appear again later after a different timestamp B? –  mihi Jun 12 '09 at 21:40
    
If it's an error log, I'm assuming the timestamps will be in order. Unless your error is a hole in the space-time continuum. –  Michael Myers Jun 12 '09 at 21:43
1  
@mmyers: don't assume too much. The big file may be the concatenation of log files from different servers. In each section the timestamps are ordered, but not across the file. That's just one case I've seen before. ;) –  brian d foy Jun 12 '09 at 21:54
    
Aha. Good thing I didn't write an answer then. –  Michael Myers Jun 12 '09 at 22:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I've had to do this task before on some very large files and the timestamps did not come in order. I didn't want to store it all in memory. I accomplished the task by using a three-pass solution:

  • Tag each input line with its timestamp and save in temp file
  • Sort the temp file with a fast sorter, like sort(1)
  • Turn the sorted file back into the starting format

This was fast enough for my task where I could let it run while I went for a cup of coffee, but you might have to do something more fancy if you need the results really quickly.

use strict;
use warnings;
use File::Temp qw(tempfile);

my( $temp_fh, $temp_filename )  = tempfile( UNLINK => 1 );

# read each line, tag with timestamp, and write to temp file
# will sort and undo later.
my $current_timestamp = '';
LINE: while( <DATA> )
    {
    chomp;

    if( m|^\d\d/\d\d/\d\d \d\d:\d\d:\d\d:\d\d\d\d$| ) # timestamp line
    	{
    	$current_timestamp = $_;
    	next LINE;
    	}
    elsif( m|\S| ) # line with non-whitespace (not a "blank line")
    	{
    	print $temp_fh "[$current_timestamp] $_\n";
    	}
    else # blank lines
    	{
    	next LINE;
    	}
    }

close $temp_fh;

# sort the file by lines using some very fast sorter
system( "sort", qw(-o sorted.txt), $temp_filename );

# read the sorted file and turn back into starting format
open my($in), "<", 'sorted.txt' or die "Could not read sorted.txt: $!";

$current_timestamp = '';
while( <$in> )
    {
    my( $timestamp, $line ) = m/\[(.*?)] (.*)/;
    if( $timestamp ne $current_timestamp )
    	{
    	$current_timestamp = $timestamp;
    	print $/, $timestamp, $/;
    	}

    print $line, $/;
    }

unlink $temp_file, 'sorted.txt';

__END__
01/01/70 12:00:00:0004
This is line 3
This is line 4
This is line 5

01/01/70 12:00:00:0001
This is line 1
This is line 2


01/01/70 12:00:00:0004
This is line 6
This is line 7
share|improve this answer
    
You don't need save 'sorted.txt' file, you can introduce security issue. You can use open '-|' form to redirect sort output. –  Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Jun 13 '09 at 7:48
    
It's sometimes nice to have the intermediate result (especially if it takes a long time to make it), but it's not a big deal. I'm not sure what security issue you think there is, but there would be other things to worry about. –  brian d foy Jun 13 '09 at 20:55
    
Awesome. This script worked. I had to tweak the regex for timestamp a bit to match mine, but got it to work. Thanks a bunch! –  Ranjith Jun 15 '09 at 19:14

If the log file is not too large to keep in memory, you can just keep a hash of date string => text. Something like this:

my %h;
my $cur = "*** No date ***";
while(<>) {
  if (m"^(\d\d/\d\d/\d\d \d\d:\d\d:\d\d:\d{4})") {
    $cur = $1;
  } else {
    $h{$cur} .= $_ unless /^\s*$/;
  }
}

print "$_\n$h{$_}\n" foreach (sort keys %h);

Thy to save this as t.pl and run it as perl t.pl < yourlog.txt. Adjust the regex if needed.

share|improve this answer
    
That's a few too many toothpicks for me: m{^( \d{2} / \d{2} / \d{2} \s \d{2} : \d{2} : \d{2} : \d{4} ) }x –  Sinan Ünür Jun 12 '09 at 23:29
    
Sinan, \d\d is shorter than \d{2} and looks better to me. As to the changing to m to avoid another backslash - that makes sense. Thanks, editing my answer. –  Igor Krivokon Jun 12 '09 at 23:47
    
\d may be shorter, but it's far less readable. –  James Thompson Jun 12 '09 at 23:55

It may be a good idea to do this in two stages if the input is huge: Create a SQLite database with a single table with a single table with columns for the timestamp and line (and maybe line number and file name). Then you can output the data any which way you want.

share|improve this answer

Consider this solution...

    #!/usr/bin/perl

    use strict;

    my (%time, $id);
    while (<DATA>) {
        if ( /^mm/ ... /\n\n/ ) {
            chomp;
            s/^mm\/dd\/yy\s(.*)// and $id = $1;
            next if ( /^mm/ || /^$/ );
            push (@{$time{$id}}, $_);
       }

}

for my $i ( keys %time ) {
    print "mm/dd/yy $i\n";
    for my $j ( @{$time{$i}} ) {
        print "$j\n";
    }
    print "\n";
}

__DATA__
mm/dd/yy 12:00:00:0001
This is line 1
This is line 2

mm/dd/yy 12:00:00:0004
This is line 3
This is line 4
This is line 5


mm/dd/yy 12:00:00:0004
This is line 6
This is line 7
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks...But this doesn't seem to combine lines 3-5 with 6 and 7. –  Ranjith Jun 15 '09 at 18:13

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