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function abc= calculate(obj)
ag=obj.turns*d/c;
end

I tried using:

temp=num2cell(obj.turns)
            s=temp{:}

But the value is replaced every time.

How can I store the value of obj.turns in this function? The value changes every time the function is called.

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Your above code is broken (Where does ag go? What do d and c come from?). And it's not clear what you mean by "storing a variable in a function"; you're passing it as a parameter, so why do you need to "store" it? –  Oli Charlesworth Mar 27 '12 at 14:26
    
ag is used in next functions, it calculates circuit parameters. All of these symbols correspond to some objects that do change their values. What I want is to plot the value of obj.turns not in this function but in the main m file –  mirage Mar 27 '12 at 14:34
4  
I don't think you quite understand the meaning of a function, because that just doesn't make any sense at all. –  Hannes Ovrén Mar 27 '12 at 14:53
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3 Answers

If I interpret what you want correctly, you should use a persistent variable. Here's an example:

function abc = calculate(obj)

  persistent storedTurns;
  if isempty(storedTurns)
    storedTurns = obj.turns;
  end

  ag = storedTurns*d/c;
  ...

end

The first time you call calculate, the value in obj.turns will be placed in storedTurns. That value will stay fixed for every other time you call calculate, ignoring from that point on whatever new values may be present in the variable obj that you pass in.

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For a persistant variable (one that exists beyond the scope of the function) like the one you require, you'll need to either make another class property to hold it, or update the existing object like in this example.

function obj = increment_x(obj) 
    obj.x=obj.x+1;
end

This is a simple function that increments the value of x. The important detail is that the function also returns the object.

Alternatively, you can make your class a subclass of the handle class. Object properties are then modified in place, so you can get away with something like the following . . .

function increment_x(obj) 
    obj.x=obj.x+1;
end
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There are a few things that could be done.

Pass in all variables into the function (Preferred method).

function ag= calculate(obj,d,c)
ag=obj.turns*d/c;
end

Use global variables. This can be very confusing, and so it not recommended.

function calculate(obj)
global ag,d,c
ag=obj.turns*d/c;
end

And some other code:

function start
global ag,d,c
c=1;d=3;
calculate(obj)
fprintf('%i',ag);
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d and c are actually objects..ie obj.m_cross_section and obj.m_inductance. Declaring them global is giving an error a red line underneath –  mirage Mar 27 '12 at 15:05
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