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I have a table that stores answers to checklist questions, where the checklists are in the format of yes, no, not applicable, or resolved.

 Table: CHECKLIST_ANSWER
        ATTRIBUTE_ID PK, FK
        CHECKLIST_INSTANCE_ID PK, FK
        TOGGLE_VALUE (1=yes, 2=No, 3=n/a, 4=was a no then it was resolved)
        FAIL_REASON

ATTRIBUTE_ID is a foreign key to a table of questions, i.e. Was the part measured within some tolerance?

Now I want to model a checklist that would store quantity responses, i.e. How many incorrect dimensions were found on the drawing?

I feel confident that I can store these questions in my same table as the yes/no/na type attributes, but can I utilize the the same table to store the quantity value? Should I add a new column say QUANTITY_VALUE ? And then either QUANTITY_VALUE or TOGGLE_VALUE would be null depending on the attribute.

 Table: CHECKLIST_ANSWER
        ATTRIBUTE_ID PK, FK
        CHECKLIST_INSTANCE_ID PK, FK
        TOGGLE_VALUE (1=yes, 2=No, 3=n/a, 4=was a no then it was resolved)
        QUANTITY_VALUE
        FAIL_REASON

The goal of this database application is to move paper and excel checklists online and capture into Oracle to give provide more efficient collection of metrics and then better aggreagation of the inputs. Am I asking for trouble down the road by blending two into one table? Or should I create a table, CHECKLIST_QTY_ANSWER

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It's hard to tell, does FAIL_REASON already make this table non-normalized? –  Tim Lehner Mar 28 '12 at 14:26
    
I guess it does, because if the TOGGLE_VALUE was 1 (yes) then that means the attribute passed so there would be no fail_reason. Should I break this column out into its own table? –  jeff Mar 28 '12 at 17:41

3 Answers 3

If you have many options, you usually create a seperate table, only with an id and description (or name). To Connect these two tables, you insert a field into the CHECKLIST_ANSWER-Table, and define it as a foreign key, which references to the id (primary key) of the new table, I have mentioned first.

Hope it is clear :)

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thanks but you did not answer the question. Read the third paragraph in my question. It states that I have a lookup table of options. –  jeff Mar 27 '12 at 17:26

I don't see any problem with adding the new column to your existing table. I would include a check constraint that required that either TOGGLE_VALUE or QUANTITY_VALUE be null (but not both).

There's no good reason to create a second, nearly identical table, where only a single column varies. In my experience, that tends to lead to more problems than the single-table solution (it's practically an invitation to use dynamic SQL).

I definitely would not re-use the existing column (as suggested in another answer), as that would prevent the use of a foreign key on the toggle value.

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If I understand your question correctly you're looking for advice on how to store the new type of answers in your schema?

Since this is a new type of answer you'd need to denote that the format of the data is now different from your y/n/na answer type. You could do this by adding another table CheckListAnswerType and a FK in your CHECKLIST_ANSWER table.

However, your CHECKLIST_INSTANCE_ID could easily indicate that this is a type of checklist that follows a certain answer pattern. I'm not sure about the rest of your schema buy you could have a CHECKLIST_INSTANCE table that specifies it's answer type...

Your TOGGLE_VALUE could follow a numeric scheme for your new answer types and with the a fore mentioned CheckListAnswerType you could and would have to always take this into account when querying the data to make sure you weren't picking the wrong answer type given the question context so that you didn't get a Yes value while looking for your How many incorrect dimensions were found on the drawing? answer.

I would think all of that would be fine, UNTIL you start wanting to store answers of a different data-type. Then it would be time to redesign schema.

TL;DR: If you're using the same data-type for answers then you would be okay re-using the existing schema (column) while adding a way to tell the answer, or question/answer, types apart to query accurately. If you want to store other data-types in TOGGLE_VALUE, implement new schema objects to do so. Don't try and force other data-types into the current schema if you can avoid it. Also if you did this consider renaming TOGGLE_VALUE as it no longer represents a Toggle. answerValue might better fit the new design.

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