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Well I think I know the answer to this, but I would appreciate anybody confirming what I suspect.

I have a large dictionary of zip codes that needs to load on program launch. It takes between 10-15 seconds, and I'd like to have a progressbar that could show, well, the progress. I can make the progress bar, and I have the total count specified as a setting. But from what I've been finding on other questions, it seems that dictionary.count cannot be bound to the progressbar with any hope of it updating regularly.

Is this true? And if so, is there another way around it?

Right now the dictionary is hardcoded, but I plan on changing that at some point in the future and have it load from a file instead. I know at that point I can just use a foreachloop to update the count each time around, but this seems kind of kludge-ish. Is there a better way to implement?

Edit:

As requested, code that loads the dictionary of zipCodes(there are actually about 40,000 more entries, but I thought I'd save space :p):

static class ZipCodes
{
    #region Methods
    public static string GetValue(string key)
    {
        string result;
        if (zipCodeDictionary.TryGetValue(key, out result))
        {
            return result;
        }
        else
        {
            return null;
        }
    }

    public static int GetCount()
    {
        return zipCodeDictionary.Count();
    }
    #endregion


    #region ZipCode Dictionary Definition
    static Dictionary<string, string> zipCodeDictionary = new Dictionary<string, string>();

    public static void PopulateZipCodeDictionary()
    {
        zipCodeDictionary.Add( "00501", "Holtsville, NY" );
        zipCodeDictionary.Add( "00544", "Holtsville, NY" );
        zipCodeDictionary.Add( "00601", "Adjuntas, PR" );
        zipCodeDictionary.Add( "00602", "Aguada, PR" );
        zipCodeDictionary.Add( "00603", "Aguadilla, PR" );
        zipCodeDictionary.Add( "00604", "Aguadilla, PR" );
share|improve this question
    
Just loop while the dictionary is loaded. Get the total amount it is going to load, and then show the progress every 1 second by dividing current from total. – Brian Graham Mar 27 '12 at 15:13
4  
I'd be curious to see what code you are using to load the zip codes. It doesn't make sense that it should take 10-15 seconds. If I were you, I'd take a look at that before trying to implement a progress bar. – Eric Dahlvang Mar 27 '12 at 15:18
1  
instead of loading it into a dictionary you should consider loading it into a datatable or something else. typically zip codes would be stored in a database table and queried using sql. it'd probably load the entire thing in memory faster than whatever you are doing as well. – Timmerz Mar 27 '12 at 15:29
    
I just completed moving it to a DB file, but using MS Access instead as it avoided the need for the whole SQL connection. Thanks for the idea though, works much better! – Keven M May 20 '12 at 16:08
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could use a BackgroundWorker if the loading process is really taking that long. Heres how to do it

  1. Create a BackgroundWorker object.

  2. Set its WorkerReportsProgress property to True.

  3. Handle the DoWork event to load the dictionary, periodically reporting progress

    private void BackgroundWorker_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
    {
        // Code to add entries to dictionary
        ...
    
        // Periodically, report progress using this call (in percentage)
        backgroundWorker.ReportProgress(percentProgress);
    }
    
  4. Handle the ProgressChanged event to update the progress bar

    private void BackgroundWorker_ProgressChanged(object sender, ProgressChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        progressBar1.Value = e.ProgressPercentage;
    }
    
share|improve this answer

The easiest method is to have indeterminate progress bar. But if you want to show bound progressbar, you can implement INotifyPropertyChanged, and have a public property which also gets incremented with each Add operation, and have the progress-bar bind to this property.

static class ZipCodes: INotifyPropertyChanged
{
#region Methods
public static string GetValue(string key)
{
    string result;
    if (zipCodeDictionary.TryGetValue(key, out result))
    {
        return result;
    }
    else
    {
        return null;
    }
}

public static int GetCount()
{
    return zipCodeDictionary.Count();
}
#endregion

#region property
private static int progress=0;
Public static int LoadingProgress
{
    get
    {
    return progress;
    }
    set
    {
    if(value!=progress)
        {
            progress = value;
            NotifyPropertyChanged("LoadingProgress");
        }
    }
}   
#endregion

#region INotifyPropertyChanged

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
    private void NotifyPropertyChanged(String property)
    {
        if (PropertyChanged != null)
        {
            PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(property));
        }
    }

#endregion


#region ZipCode Dictionary Definition
static Dictionary<string, string> zipCodeDictionary = new Dictionary<string, string>();

public static void PopulateZipCodeDictionary()
{
    zipCodeDictionary.Add( "00501", "Holtsville, NY" );
    LoadingProgress++;
    zipCodeDictionary.Add( "00544", "Holtsville, NY" );
    LoadingProgress++;
    zipCodeDictionary.Add( "00601", "Adjuntas, PR" );
    LoadingProgress++;
share|improve this answer
    
For a while I did use the indeterminate ProgressBar, in combination with a background worker. Just completed switching over to a MS Access DB file instead though, so no problems any more. – Keven M May 20 '12 at 16:09

You could create your own dictionary implementation by deriving from Dictionary<TKey, TValue>. This implementation additionally could implement the interface INotifyCollectionChanged and raise the event in the call to your overridden Add method. Your application then could listen to this event and update the progress bar accordingly.

Having said that, I wouldn't do that. If it takes only a few seconds to load, I would just display an indeterminate progress bar. It's much simpler and still sufficient.

share|improve this answer

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