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I'm trying to free memory that's reallocated but I get an error...

float * foo = NULL;
float * bar = NULL;

void update()
{
    ...
    foo = (float *)malloc( a * 2 * sizeof(float));
    ...
    bar = (float *)realloc( foo, a * 2 * sizeof(float));
    ...
    free( foo );
    ...
    // when i do
    if(bar != NULL)
    {
        free(bar); // <-- error at executing
    }
}

I get error: http://d.pr/mpBF and visual studio shows me the following file:

osfinfo.c
=========
void __cdecl _unlock_fhandle (
        int fh
        )
{
        LeaveCriticalSection( &(_pioinfo(fh)->lock) );
}

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
1  
Is the value of a-variable 0? – Juho Mar 27 '12 at 15:16
1  
Do you do anything with foo between those malloc and realloc? Or do you do anything with bar between realloc and free? – Juho Mar 27 '12 at 15:24
3  
It is funny... This code works fine here with my GCC... I think the cause of your problem is actually at one of the "..." sections... – André Puel Mar 27 '12 at 15:27
2  
This is not the cause of your problem, but allow me to say that if(bar != NULL) is kind of useless, since free performs no operation given a null pointer. – Damon Mar 27 '12 at 15:30
1  
@aljndrrr The solution posted by bames53 is incorrect. If the call to realloc fails it will return NULL, and you will have no way of freeing the memory allocated by the preceding malloc call. David Heffernan's answer shows the correct way of handling malloc and realloc. – Praetorian Mar 27 '12 at 15:48
up vote 2 down vote accepted

When you realloc memory you should not free the old memory.

bar = (float *)realloc( foo, a * 2 * sizeof(float));
free( foo ); // <-- this is wrong

You want:

float * foo = NULL;

void update()
{
    ...
    foo = (float *)malloc( a * 2 * sizeof(float));
    ...
    float * bar = (float *)realloc( foo, a * 2 * sizeof(float));
    if(bar)
       foo = bar;
    ...
    free(foo);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This code commits the classic realloc error. If the call to realloc fails then you won't be able to free foo and the memory will be leaked. – David Heffernan Mar 27 '12 at 15:44
    
@DavidHeffernan And of course, you don't have to check for NULL before free (but you do have to check after the malloc and the realloc). – James Kanze Mar 27 '12 at 16:03
    
@DavidHeffernan fixed. (I'm still leaving it to '...' to actually decide what should happen in case of an allocation error though) – bames53 Mar 27 '12 at 16:10
    
@bmaes53 Good. I've removed my downvote, and also removed the spurious if foo != NULL check before calling free. – David Heffernan Mar 27 '12 at 16:12
foo = (float *)malloc( a * 2 * sizeof(float));
bar = (float *)realloc( foo, a * 2 * sizeof(float));
free( foo ); // oops, foo has gone

At the point at which you call free(foo), foo is invalid since it was already freed when you called realloc.

The code should be something like this pseudo-code:

foo = (float *)malloc( a * 2 * sizeof(float));
if (foo == NULL) 
    return ERROR_CODE;
...
bar = (float *)realloc( foo, a * 2 * sizeof(float));
if (bar == NULL) 
{
    free(foo);
    return ERROR_CODE;
}
...
free(bar);
return SUCCESS;

Of course, since this is C++, you should be avoiding malloc and free altogether and using std::vector<float>.

share|improve this answer

My guess is that the realloc call manages to extend the memory allocated by the call to malloc. In this case both foo and bar will point to the same memory address, and you're freeing foo somewhere before trying to free bar resulting in a double deletion.

You do not need to free( foo ) at all because realloc will do that for you if the memory area was moved during reallocation. From the linked page:

If the area pointed to was moved, a free(ptr) is done.

share|improve this answer

Once you've passed a pointer to realloc(), it is formally deallocated (freed) and you must not free it again.

C99 §7.20.3.4 The realloc function

2 The realloc function deallocates the old object pointed to by ptr and returns a pointer to a new object that has the size specified by size. The contents of the new object shall be the same as that of the old object prior to deallocation, up to the lesser of the new and old sizes. Any bytes in the new object beyond the size of the old object have indeterminate values.

It may happen that realloc() returns the same pointer as it was given, but you cannot assume that it will in general. And once you've passed a pointer to realloc() (or free()) you must assume it is no longer a valid pointer.

The rules in C++ are basically the same; it incorporates the C89 standard for functions from C such as realloc().

Your system is correct to complain that you're freeing unallocated memory.

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