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As you maybe know, as Java language perspective all method in C# are final by default (also vice versa, all methods in Java are virtual as C# language perspective).

In C# we can replace final (non-virtual) methods by new keyword (please see this). There is not anyway to replace final methods in Java?

Edit 1:

I just want to mention that method replacing is not same with method overriding. Please run this C# code:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace ComapreOverrideWithNew
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var cat = new Cat();
            cat.PrintNameByNew();
            Console.WriteLine(cat.GetNameByNew());
            cat.PrintNameByOverride();
            Console.WriteLine(cat.GetNameByOverride());
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
    class Animal
    {
        public String GetNameByNew()
        {
            return "Animal";
        }
        public void PrintNameByNew()
        {
            Console.WriteLine(GetNameByNew());
        }

        public virtual String GetNameByOverride()
        {
            return "Animal";
        }
        public void PrintNameByOverride()
        {
            Console.WriteLine(GetNameByOverride());
        }
    }
    class Cat : Animal
    {
        new public String GetNameByNew()
        {
            return "Cat";
        }

        public override String GetNameByOverride()
        {
            return "Cat";
        }
    }
}

For example http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/IandI/final.html is just talking about overriding. Also this code have not any compiler warning on compilation.

share|improve this question
    
I think this is a matter of design intent. In C#, a method being non-virtual could simply be an oversight (as it is the default, like you mentioned). In Java, being non-virtual requires explicit intent, which implies the method's implementation is critical to the proper functioning of the class and its descendents. To allow the new keyword to take on this role in Java would violate the open-closed principal. –  jpm Mar 27 '12 at 15:23
    
Of-course it is. I want to just be sure about it :) –  Ebrahim Byagowi Mar 27 '12 at 16:02
    
The intent of final in java is just that - prevent people form 'modifying'. I would suggest to work with the language no against .... –  hburde Mar 27 '12 at 16:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You cannot replace final methods in Java.

share|improve this answer
    
I should hope not! That would invalidate the whole point. –  Louis Wasserman Mar 27 '12 at 15:22
    
Well it's not a matter of replacing so much as hiding, right? It's a naming issue really. –  Paul Bellora Mar 27 '12 at 15:25
    
If you don't need to expose them, you can just make them private. Otherwise you need to choose a different name or overload a method with different set of parameters (if you want to keep the same name). –  Eugene Retunsky Mar 27 '12 at 15:31

There's no such thing in Java. A final method cannot be overridden.

share|improve this answer
    
There's no such thing as method "replacing". –  m0skit0 Mar 28 '12 at 6:36
    
Again: there's such thing. If the method is visible, you can only override it if it's not final. If it's not visible, then you're not hiding/replacing/new method anything (since it's not visible). –  m0skit0 Mar 28 '12 at 14:06

All the new keyword does in C# is suppress a compiler warning.

share|improve this answer
    
I can not see compiler warning, please see my example that I added in my question. –  Ebrahim Byagowi Mar 27 '12 at 16:11

The only way to create a "new" final method in java is if the method is marked private. The following is legal:

public class A  
{
   private final void go(){};
}

class B extends A  
{  
    private final void go() {};
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Nice answer, didn't thought about it, but technically, B's go() does not "replace" A's go() method. –  m0skit0 Mar 27 '12 at 15:29
1  
@m0skit0 correct and technically B doesn't even know about A.go . Also why I put "new" in quotes –  Woot4Moo Mar 27 '12 at 15:31
    
@EbrahimByagowi the java spec was set up to make it so you cannot do what you want. –  Woot4Moo Mar 27 '12 at 16:39

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