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I'm interested in playing around with the word list used in the popular iPhone game "Draw Something".

I don't know how iPhone apps are developed, compiled, or deployed, but I'm wondering if, once the app is installed on my iPhone, the word list is kept in a file I can access/read/modify?

I'm sure this varies from app to app - some apps might keep resources like this on a server, and in other apps, the data might be compiled. But perhaps some apps read data like this from something like XML- or CSV-formatted text files that are stored on the phone, and potentially accessible? (Or, backed up to your PC or Mac?)

If so - are those files accessible? If so, where/how?

I'm not an iOS developer, and I'm not interested in copying, stealing, or plagarizing anything from an existing app.

Specifically - I am interested in creating an information visualization based on the word list from "Draw Something." How many words are there? Which words are "easy", which are "hard"? Is it harder to draw a verb, a noun, or an adjective? I thought this might be a fun, (potentially) interesting thing to analyze.

That got me thinking... "I wonder how apps are stored on my phone?" (Or, backed up to my PC/Mac). Are they a single compiled executable? A handful of dlls? Is app data stored in simple text files, a database, or something else? Are these files accessible? Etc.

Many thanks in advance!

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Just out of curiousity... can someone tell me why this got down-voted? (Not disputing, just want to understand so I don't do it again...) Is it that it's unethical/inappropriate to mess with or extract the config/data files of apps, or that this doesn't have to do with coding? Or, that it's too obvious (easily answered elsewhere?) –  mattstuehler Mar 27 '12 at 16:28
    
Rereading now, I think someone perceived it as asking advice on how to take data from another party's app. No such capability exists, and doing so would violate your developer agreement (at the very least). I didn't catch that on my first read; I thought you were looking for a rundown of ways to achieve local storage in iOS Maybe you should edit the question to make it's legitimate intent clear? As a question on ways to save stuff locally, it's a good question, and I'll +1 it. –  danh Mar 27 '12 at 18:06
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You probably got down voted (and may yet get removed) because this isn't really a programming question, and those are what SO is for. Power-user questions fit better elsewhere in the Stack Exchange network.

In the meantime, if it turns out this word list is stored in an easily readable file in the app's bundle... Apps are stored on the Mac/PC you sync your device to, somewhere under the iTunes Music folder. Each is a ".ipa" file, which is really just a zip archive. Change the file extension and you can unzip it to see what's inside.

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Thanks, rickster. Makes perfect sense. For what it's worth, thanks to your answer, I found the .ipa file, unzipped it, and discovered that the word list is not included as a seperate, readable file. So, I'm guessing that it's compiled into the application file itself. Oh well. –  mattstuehler Mar 28 '12 at 12:56
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Apps get file system access through the sdk. There is also a object-relational framework called Core Data that lets an app create and access a SQLite store. Apps can also maintain a small amount of state (usually user prefs) in a shared user defaults store.

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In one word: No.

I'm 99% sure you can't lift the word list from "Draw Something". It's boxed with the app bundle, and not readily readable as a file.

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